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Thread: The break down in obedience, rules ,work ethic - the epiphany of our young generation

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    Platinum do ron's Avatar
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    The break down in obedience, rules ,work ethic - the epiphany of our young generation

    When i say young im referring to 16-25 year bracket , maybe im just getting ( old at 37 i shouldn't be )

    But our school leavers now just seem lost with how life works , whats expected off them at work , authority and why there are rules in place

    I acted the lad as much as anyone in my early days - but todays young lads just seem on a different planet half the time

    I suppose they could blame the parenting - my generation .......
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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
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    We first grew up, and then came all these IT inventions..

    Must be hard growing up with all this always around, that virtual reality where you can be anything or anyone, where everything is available and where stickers are just as valid as words..
    The sense of entitlement that brings.. Authority? that is something that needs to be hacked, right? 555

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    Organic AI Quarky's Avatar
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    Nothing's changed.... they were always there. Remember the losers in your class at school? There were hundreds of the fuckers in my first year,... clueless twats... 55.

    Now you are older/ a parent you notice them more... plenty of bright sparks around/ plenty of hard workers too... and those clueless twats? They're still there too...
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    My only experience was in a pie making factory managing the gravy team


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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    I completely and utterly disagree

    Kids are no different than we were.....and if anything, they are 10x smarter than we were when I finished University.

    I have 6 nephews 19-23yrs old and none of them are remotely like you explained.

    Because of my position at work, I get emails from young kids looking to get into my business all the time. I get kids coming in to sit with me and ask questions. They are pretty damn intelligent kids, a hell of lot smarter than I ever was

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    Organic AI Quarky's Avatar
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    ^Dunno about smarter... but certainly seem more worldly wise.. maybe thanks to the access to information they now have...
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    My only experience was in a pie making factory managing the gravy team


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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Distantpeak View Post
    ^Dunno about smarter... but certainly seem more worldly wise.. maybe thanks to the access to information they now have...
    I haven't noticed that but mostly because of where I am from and in Vancouver everyone is worldly

    But, without a doubt, I think kids are much more knowledgeable about the fields they are pursuing than we were as kids.

    We graduated and chose a field we were interested in and learned it. Kids these days seem to be much more prepared for the job once they start
    At least is my field for sure

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    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Minder's Avatar
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    MarcTwoSix and I agree !!!! Call the Guinness book of Records people !!! 555

    The company runs a University "Graduate" placement program of some kind - in practice it means we have had a 25-ish year old working around the office in six month or so stints this last year - I have asked that the next one be the runt of the litter and not the pick as the last two have been as I am sick of feeling old, slow and stupid.

    Both kids have Asian heritage (mostly Chinese). Both are a credit to their family.

    The 27 year old "joe average" office worker I was talking to on Friday is busily saving a deposit for a house - his second job is as a "Limo" driver - he and his GF are aiming for a house deposit of $80K - that deposit is $5k more than double the price of my first house purchased in 1983.

    These kids are probably a little older than the ones the Op is talking about - perhaps they beat the cut-off 555

    P.s Glad to be an "old fart" sometimes - Not sure I'd want to be starting out in today's world.
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    I can see both sides of the discussion and neither point is wrong. It all comes down to parenting, family circumstances and where you are from. You are not going to get the same results if you are from the southern USA states when compared to someone raised in Vancouver, BC. Or, if you were born in central Africa to black parents.

    I'm a fanatic about proper parenting and know how important it is. I've seen the results of both good and bad parenting, and even by parents who actually care. I think many people expect school teachers to do most of the training, and that is a total fallacy. I saw it when we had a daycare in our home for 5 years.

    Life is a series of choices from the time you get up in the morning until you go to bed at night.

    We are born with certain personalities that can be squelched or developed depending on the parenting. What works for one child does not necessarily work for a sibling. After that it is up to the person to pay attention and learn from their experiences. If you get mixed in with the wrong people then it's easy to go astray.

    However, good parenting goes a LONG way in developing a child's direction so they can make proper decisions and choices in life. The young adults that I know who seem well grounded all came from parents who were solid citizens themselves. I can think of dozens of personal examples. The remainder are just a crap shoot who were lucky or unlucky to have survived. The great majority of people are basically raised by their peers. After that it's just a person's personality and their own choices in life that determines their fate.

    Asians in Vancouver set higher standards for their children... and it shows. I hate sounding racist, but our First Nations people in western Canada rank very low on the scale when it comes to education or achievement. And, they are constant complainers.

    I live in a smallish town on Vancouver Island. There is a large First Nations band here. They don't mix with the "white" families that make up the bulk of the people. There is also a large Sikh community that stays separated from any other group. The high school graduates show a distinct separation within the various groups.
    Last edited by Ian Forbes; 11th September 2017 at 11:59.
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    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Changone's Avatar
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    I have believed for a long time that although you can be young and fit with a keen mind, you generally don't know what you're really doing till you reach age 25.
    (Girls maybe 21).

    The key IMO is to live through the time from adolescence till then without making any life changing errors.
    Yes, plenty of headaches and band aids that's all part of learning, but avoiding excesses of all kinds as much as possible.

    Today however, there are more distractions than ever that can push or pull you in the wrong direction.
    One of the closed facebook groups i'm in is fraught with young guys talking about depression and hopelessness as a result of relationship splits and job fluctuations.
    There was one who said he moved to England to escape his ex and unfair government treatment and was now holed up and home drinking 3-4 litres of wine and cider after work every day and asking if this was bad. At least he's getting group support.

    Just not knowing that most things will pass because you simply haven't been around long enough is most of it.

    Aside from that, all the same barriers to employment/acceptance are still there except there are more of them.

    Those that make it are those that get knocked down, but keep on getting up again no matter what.

    So for me, what looks like lack of direction is simply testing the water and trying to get enough life experience to find and keep moving toward something worthwhile.
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    I think we learn more from our mistakes than from our successes. But, the key is to pay attention to everything. Those that do nothing tend to be boring, know it all people. One of the most important lessons in my life was joining a debating team at university. I only joined because of a pretty girl I was interested in. In a debating team you were never allowed to debate from a personal view point. You always had to debate against what you actually believed in. If you wanted to win you had to do some serious studying. It was an eye opener learning the OTHER side of any topic.

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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Zablive's Avatar
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    Hmmmmm.

    I think I could still run rings (metaphorically) around today's students/graduates in my field.
    They seem to rely too much on access to technology and "research - the one that teaches you the most is that you did yourself, going through the processes).

    What they lack is a thorough understanding of the human condition and it's always varying varieties.
    You can't learn that with your head buried in a smartassfone.

    That's also why my profession is not threatened greatly by robots (if you understand the basics for a diagnosis).
    Robots will never have instinct.
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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zablive View Post
    Hmmmmm.

    I think I could still run rings (metaphorically) around today's students/graduates in my field.
    They seem to rely too much on access to technology and "research - the one that teaches you the most is that you did yourself, going through the processes).

    What they lack is a thorough understanding of the human condition and it's always varying varieties.
    You can't learn that with your head buried in a smartassfone.

    That's also why my profession is not threatened greatly by robots (if you understand the basics for a diagnosis).
    Robots will never have instinct.
    Well, wouldn't that always be the case when dealing with human element?
    You can learn the text/research and then you learn the process of working the human element as you gain more practical experience??

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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
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    I don't think the window lickers have grown in number either, although a couple of factors might be making them a bit worse. More distractions as already mentioned, as well as discipline practices getting more lax. Some kids are just too dumb and need to be beaten into submission. They need to bring back the cane in schools. And forget even talking to one the wrong way if it's in public or not your own kid, you'll get torn a new asshole by the courts.

    But at the same time there are also plenty of good kids around who are far smarter than any previous generation and they far outnumber the troubled ones. And yes, you can usually trace that back to good parenting. Social class has a lot to do with this. Upper middle classes of course produce much better products, whilst the troubled ones are usually squirted out by the lower income brackets.
    Last edited by Bacon; 11th September 2017 at 15:37.
    Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.


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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน slampay's Avatar
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    I'm convinced raising little blank-slate baby's into good moral adults is a lot of very hard work.... Guess work. 55

    Man, I was wild child. Stupid, crazy stuff.. until I had my first son. That shot the buttons off my shirt I'll tell ya! . I thought I knew it all, was a fcuking land pirate and nothing could faze me...right?


    Moving forward. I've never could have imagined the amount of 'WTF' moments I had raising my boys. Absolute fear, terror and sweaty palm angst...mixed together with an overwhelming carefulness and love I felt. we ended up making each other better. It was/is a daily thing.
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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Cuzzy's Avatar
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    Despite me being their father my eldest children are fantastic people.

    Probably due to their observance of my poor behaviour 555.

    I have changed a lot and I hope to instill the same values in our new girl. She is 20 months now, speaking Isaan and starting to use a few words of English.
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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zablive View Post
    Hmmmmm.

    I think I could still run rings (metaphorically) around today's students/graduates in my field.
    They seem to rely too much on access to technology and "research - the one that teaches you the most is that you did yourself, going through the processes).

    What they lack is a thorough understanding of the human condition and it's always varying varieties.
    You can't learn that with your head buried in a smartassfone.

    That's also why my profession is not threatened greatly by robots (if you understand the basics for a diagnosis).
    Robots will never have instinct.
    There was a time when abacus users used to turn their nose up at calculators, claim they were a fad and boast about being more efficient on the old gear. But times change, the amount of information and work you deal with changes and the level of processing that's needed moves up a notch, so you need to have computers do more and more of the donkey work.

    I work with older guys who are very professional and great at what they do, but they come from a time where the industry's "metabolism", for lack of a better term, was much slower. They generally do well up to a certain point in the day, but when the pace really starts to pick up and get to today's speeds, they start to fall apart and just can't cope. Seeing this more and more these days. And a lot of it comes down to being able to utilise technology well enough to keep yourself organised and on top of the work or you'll be doggy paddling by 11am.
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    Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.


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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
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    ^ That said, I do agree that as pace increases, the depth and breadth of thought and general contemplation about life can decrease, but not necessarily. Depends on the individual.
    Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.


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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Zablive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacon View Post
    There was a time when abacus users used to turn their nose up at calculators, claim they were a fad and boast about being more efficient on the old gear. But times change, the amount of information and work you deal with changes and the level of processing that's needed moves up a notch, so you need to have computers do more and more of the donkey work.

    I work with older guys who are very professional and great at what they do, but they come from a time where the industry's "metabolism", for lack of a better term, was much slower. They generally do well up to a certain point in the day, but when the pace really starts to pick up and get to today's speeds, they start to fall apart and just can't cope. Seeing this more and more these days. And a lot of it comes down to being able to utilise technology well enough to keep yourself organised and on top of the work or you'll be doggy paddling by 11am.
    But I bet you have learnt a lot from those "older guys" outside of technology.
    Political Correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and promoted by a sick mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end!

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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zablive View Post
    But I bet you have learnt a lot from those "older guys" outside of technology.
    Yes of course, cause they've been around longer. Doesn't somehow make them special.

    I'll be one of them one day and I'll be teaching the young kids. My experience will allow me to run rings around them in some ways cause I would have screwed up a few times more, and hopefully learned a couple of lessons, but at the same time they'll be smarter and quicker and will definitely be running rings around me in more ways than one.

    And if this ends up being the general trend, then we're moving in the right direction.
    PeteGill likes this.
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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacon View Post
    There was a time when abacus users used to turn their nose up at calculators, claim they were a fad and boast about being more efficient on the old gear. But times change, the amount of information and work you deal with changes and the level of processing that's needed moves up a notch, so you need to have computers do more and more of the donkey work.

    I work with older guys who are very professional and great at what they do, but they come from a time where the industry's "metabolism", for lack of a better term, was much slower. They generally do well up to a certain point in the day, but when the pace really starts to pick up and get to today's speeds, they start to fall apart and just can't cope. Seeing this more and more these days. And a lot of it comes down to being able to utilise technology well enough to keep yourself organised and on top of the work or you'll be doggy paddling by 11am.
    I never got the older guy's reluctance to use technology, either in life or work.
    I'm not a tech wiz, by any means, but I learn what is helpful to me.

    I know more about the tech side of our trading systems than anyone on my desk.
    Because knowing that as much as I can, helps my business.

    Actually, my job has grown so much away from actual trading. Most traders can trade an order
    It's learning the mundane things like the tech side of the trading systems and the back office stuff that gives me an advantage.

    Some guys I worked with felt too important to learn any of that and most bitch and moan thier business is dying

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