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Thread: Finally getting some Thai lessons

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    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน G4orce's Avatar
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    Finally getting some Thai lessons

    I today booked in to start getting one on one Thai language lessons. I have been talking about doing it for so long but today actually made the move and booked in. I have 2 x 2 hour lesson in just over 2 weeks (had to wait until pay day 555). For all the other Victorian reading (PPB :P) I found a place in Belgrave where they do Language and cooking lessons. As far as i am aware the lessons are at a Thai Ladies house and are at $25 an hour. On the next trip I am going to meet the GF's Mum and grandmother who cannot English but can speak Thai (they are Isaan) so will do the right thing and learn some basic Conversational things to say. Below is the link I found her by.

    Silk Steps:Thai Cooking and Language Learning Centre Melbourne Australia

    I have some very very basic language skills so this will be great for me I feel. I have tried books, cds, videos but I am more a hands on learner so feel the tutoring will be the best method for me. While we are on the topic are there any Thai Phrases that could be helpful for me for meeting the Mum?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Arliss Michaels's Avatar
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    These should get you in the good books 555

    Hello = Sawa dee
    Thank you (man says) = Kob Khun Krap
    Thank you (woman says) = Kob Khun Ka
    How are you? = Khun sabai di mai?
    I am fine thanks = (man says) Pom sabai di krap.
    I am fine thanks= (woman says) Chan sabai di ka.
    Basically women say "ka" at the end of a sentence
    while men say "krap".
    You're welcome = Yin dee krap / ka
    Wait = Roh sakru
    I= pom (man)
    I= chan (woman)
    Come = ma
    Come from = ma jak
    I come from Australia = Pom ma jak pratet Australia (man)/
    Chan ma jak pratet Australia (woman)
    I love Thailand = Pom/chan rak Meuang Thai.
    I love you= pom/chan rak khun
    The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese

  3. #3
    The artist formally known as Wabbits Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน wabbits's Avatar
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    I think i have mentioned it before, Lonely Planet's Thai phrase book, this is gold.
    Can buy from most book shops and the post office well here in QLD anyway.

    Check it out
    .

  4. #4
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Minder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G4orce View Post
    I today booked in to start getting one on one Thai language lessons. I have been talking about doing it for so long but today actually made the move and booked in. I have 2 x 2 hour lesson in just over 2 weeks (had to wait until pay day 555). For all the other Victorian reading (PPB :P) I found a place in Belgrave where they do Language and cooking lessons. As far as i am aware the lessons are at a Thai Ladies house and are at $25 an hour. On the next trip I am going to meet the GF's Mum and grandmother who cannot English but can speak Thai (they are Isaan) so will do the right thing and learn some basic Conversational things to say. Below is the link I found her by.

    Silk Steps:Thai Cooking and Language Learning Centre Melbourne Australia

    I have some very very basic language skills so this will be great for me I feel. I have tried books, cds, videos but I am more a hands on learner so feel the tutoring will be the best method for me. While we are on the topic are there any Thai Phrases that could be helpful for me for meeting the Mum?

    Thanks in advance
    I did something similar years ago - I still think it was a good way to supplement your learning BUT don't expect too much in the way of detailed lesson development plans and structured learning (if I am wrong - that is a good thing for you).

    Sorry but these setups are invariably run by amateurs who think they can teach a language just because they can speak it - again, hope I am wrong.

    Go prepared - Print out pages from this website and take them with you
    *****http://www.learningthai.com/greetings.html ***** - read out the Thai phrase and be guided by her corrections.

    Worst case scenario - YOU mostly prepare the lessons it might save a lot of awkward silence in the classroom and still get your money's worth.

    Thai tutor books etc: those of us who can read two letters of Thai scipt or less - Always get your advice of how to say a Thai word from someone who speaks the same brand of English as you do. IMO Lonely Planet has the best transliteration of Thai for the Australian dialect.

    Enjoy

    *********************http://www.learningthai.com/l_difficulties.html
    Thai Language - Learn to Speak Thai
    ************************************
    Life is the unexpected ...

  5. #5
    Organic AI Quarky's Avatar
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    Minder? Do you speak Thai now? Has this been learned just by talking to Mrs M over the years?
    My only experience was in a pie making factory managing the gravy team


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    Cadet Gold giggsy's Avatar
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    Good on you G4orce.

    Best thing I ever did was get on the path to learning Thai.
    Make sure you keep the reasons strong for wanting to learn
    and supplement the lessons with learning in your own time, when you can of course.

    I still throw in an hour of Thai reading a day. I did conversation for a while and then
    went straight on to studying Thai script.
    When you can read a word in Thai script it becomes far easier to pronounce
    than in the silly English translations of the Thai words they give in books.

    If you have any questions any time don't hesitate to ask. Its not simple
    but its not rocket science either.
    Its all about as you Aussies say '' doing the hard yards''
    Good on you sir.

  7. #7
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน G4orce's Avatar
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    Thanks Guys. I o no the basic stuff so wanted to move on to some more things to try and keep a convo going. I am not sure how the lessons with go but I have to give it a shot. I seriously want to learn so i guess that is a good thing. I feel you have to want something to be able to do it. I am still young and have a GF who is more then willing to help so i am sure i will learn soon enough. Than i have to try Isaan :S One step at a time 5555

    Giggsy, As for Thai Script i did spend a bit of time learning bits and pieces of that and it is really not that hard once you get the hang of it, but i thought I better learn one thing at a time and learn to speak it first. My GF can only read and write Very little Thai and No english at all, So i am thinking we can both learn to read and write together. Will be another chance to bond more and do something together.

  8. #8
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Minder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by giggsy View Post
    Good on you G4orce.

    Best thing I ever did was get on the path to learning Thai.
    Make sure you keep the reasons strong for wanting to learn
    and supplement the lessons with learning in your own time, when you can of course.

    I still throw in an hour of Thai reading a day. I did conversation for a while and then
    went straight on to studying Thai script.
    When you can read a word in Thai script it becomes far easier to pronounce
    than in the silly English translations of the Thai words they give in books.


    If you have any questions any time don't hesitate to ask. Its not simple
    but its not rocket science either.
    Its all about as you Aussies say '' doing the hard yards''
    Good on you sir.
    Total agreement with Giggsy - the best way to really learn is regular study and gaining some knowledge of the thai script so you can get past the English translations (which vary widely between the countries, British English, American English, Australian English - Khap, Krap, Cap, Crap, etc.)

    One way I found to ensure regular study was to burn the lessons onto CD and play them to myself driving to work - alot easier now with personal devices and MP3 etc

    Also from the outset get in the habit of adding the polite partial at the end of your sentences - Khap for males, Ka for females. It is a lot harder to get that habit later.

    Enjoy
    Life is the unexpected ...

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    The artist formally known as Wabbits Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน wabbits's Avatar
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    What time frame would you allow for reasonable understanding of Thai script and what hours per week should you set?
    .

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    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน G4orce's Avatar
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    The good thing I found with Thai script was that if you can memorize the symbols and the sounds they make you should be able to read the words. Unlike English where each letter may make a different sound depending on what word it is used in. Thai script has 44 constants and 32 vowels so it is a little harder to memorize the sounds. Depending if the smbol is at the start of the end of the word is what sound it will make

    I had a look and found this link to be very helpful
    Thai script - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  11. #11
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Minder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Distantpeak View Post
    Minder? Do you speak Thai now? Has this been learned just by talking to Mrs M over the years?
    Wow, you have no idea how loaded those two questions are...555

    Do I speak Thai now? Interesting that you add the word "now" because I myself think that my Thai language skills are weaker now than they were say five thru seven years ago when I first met and married Mrs M.

    I very actively studied the thai language for several years - the learning thai website was my second home on the net - I attended adult learning classes, had private tutoring and purchased lots of books, cds and computer programs.

    Then I met and married Mrs M and the rot set in. Having a Thai partner can make some of us lazy, you tend to let them do the talking. On our last trip to Thailand I had to request a taxi by phone - 100% Thai - in the end, I did it easily enough but I was so nervous picking up the phone because for the first time in ages I did not have Mrs M there as a fall back.

    Now keeping in mind that Mrs M will read this reply to the second part of your question
    Quote Originally Posted by Distantpeak View Post
    ...Has this been learned just by talking to Mrs M over the years?
    IMO unless you both really pay attention to it - the partnership can be counter-productive to the language skills of both of you. You tend to develop your own version of "thinglish" - half half phrases that confuse both languages - "key mai?" as we leave the house means "Do you have the house key with you?" - overheard by a Thai it means something else.

    Finally IMHO - and no doubt this varies between couples - learning Thai from your partner directly is about as wise as a husband trying to teach his wife to drive a car. On the other hand having a Thai partner around means you overhear Thai conversations all the time and that helps keep you ears tuned to the Thai language.

    This thread is actually inspiring me to get back to work on my reading and writing Thai skills - I hate not being able to read a Thai menu or food shop sign.

    Edit in - I should add that without the basic Thai skills I had at the time we first met the relationship between Mrs M and I may not have developed the way it did.

    Enjoy
    Last edited by Minder; 2nd April 2011 at 09:21. Reason: add on
    Life is the unexpected ...

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    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Minder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wabbits View Post
    What time frame would you allow for reasonable understanding of Thai script and what hours per week should you set?
    Giggsy........jump in any time mate
    Life is the unexpected ...

  13. #13
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน G4orce's Avatar
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    Slow day shift at work today, What do you think im doing now....yep learning Thai 55555

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    Cadet Gold giggsy's Avatar
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    There are some really great points here and I admire you all for having a real good go
    at the language. I know ex pats who have lived in Thailand for years and can't even trot out the odd sentence in Thai
    and they don't want to.

    You are already way ahead with the want to.
    You are already ahead with basic conversation.
    Definitely keep enough reasons for wanting to learn the language and don't overwhelm yourself with it.
    By overwhelm I mean don't think I have been doing this for such an amount of time and should be better.

    I was like all of you. I started with a Thai linguaphone course and included was a small Thai script book.
    It advised to start learning the script when you got to lesson 10 and there were 40 lessons' but I took one look at it and removed it
    from the box. It was not until I hired a Thai/English (translator) native Thai teacher in the UK some years later that she gave me this same
    book to start learning from. I would sit in a classroom shouting back the alphabet and verbs. Learning these basics really helped me, especially the alphabet.
    It was from then that I was able to pronounce words properly. My teacher also made me audio tapes as ''Minder'' said
    which you can just play whenever your driving anywhere.

    There is also the different parts of learning a language. I am strongest at reading Thai, but I figure its because I do a lot of it. I am weaker at hearing Thai.
    You have different accents, slang to deal with and I will often be slower responding to some Thais.

    My learning is still continued, but always on my own now. I buy Thai script books at different age levels and have done this for a few years now to work my way up, just like you do at school really. I mean we are not natives we cannot just start belting out Thai the same. I now read novels (slowly). Choosing a subject you enjoy to read about is beneficial I have found. You learn quicker as you want to get the information or the part of the story. I read a chapter through and then work on it. I highlight the words I don't know and then go to my dictionary and find them in Thai of course. I then start translating the chapter, which can take two or three weeks work depending on the time I have with it each day. Whilst translating I highlight sentences that I have really got a grasp of and use them during the day to myself. Like '' I don't like to waste time'' ''ผมไม่ชอบเสียเวลา'' phom may choop sia wela. I find reading actually improves my conversation ability.

    This is what works for me. We have to find a way that suits us best.
    Really great comments here by you all. Wabbits, It depends on how much time you have a day to devote to the project, but my brain starts to go numb after more than an hour and a half a day. In the beginning I was never more than 2 hours a day and more productive during an hour and a half. I know making positive progress in measurable time is our western way but don't blow yourself out. Small steps are great. Short well focused, organised periods do it for me.

    I must admit I am with ''Minder'' on the part of learning with your Thai wife. It has never been possible with us. One of the reasons is my wife has no interest at all on language learning and it bores her to death. We tried it a few times and divorce would have come before my language progress. So I found it best to go alone as soon as I knew the alphabet and such.

    The sad part is my wife's Thai friends won't speak Thai around me anymore apparently I am too dangerous. It really is about continued learning, I am still very much a student and have had times where I have thought I have made no progress at all. However you are making progress each day you continue to do it. For me now I don't set targets, I just consistently work (very focused) in shorter, pre -determined periods.

    Is any one still awake. I sometimes do this. Get in the zone and wabbit on. I mean rabbit on. Regards

  15. #15
    The artist formally known as Wabbits Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน wabbits's Avatar
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    ^Not at all you confirmed somethings for me and have given me a plan.
    Motivation from where ever it comes because without will never succeed in learning Thai.
    Love singing so Karaoke but you can be a parrot and do that i want to understand.
    Plus when i go village i want to understand all the talk even if not overly exciting and mostly just about food.
    Seriously i do not need to Mrs W has good English and is way ahead of me in learning a third language.
    How unfair if i took no interest! I want to not be found to be stupid which i feel you are to a degree when you can not speak the local language.
    .

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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน justcruzing1's Avatar
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    Giggsy,
    Thanks for that, it is very informative. I know what you mean about getting in a zone when posting, and I like to read post's that are like it because I get to feel so much more from it.

    I started to try Thai, and got a bit overwhelmed with it. Also ran out of time a bit when I finally went back to work.

    I have gathered a few sayings and words, like Happy Birthday, I love you, etc. and I have some DVD's in Thai that I get some from.

    I think your process sounds much more organised and I'll try to learn a bit of each speaking and reading.

    Thanks for your input.

  17. #17
    Organic AI Quarky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minder View Post
    Wow, you have no idea how loaded those two questions are...555

    Do I speak Thai now? Interesting that you add the word "now" because I myself think that my Thai language skills are weaker now than they were say five thru seven years ago when I first met and married Mrs M.

    I very actively studied the thai language for several years - the learning thai website was my second home on the net - I attended adult learning classes, had private tutoring and purchased lots of books, cds and computer programs.

    Then I met and married Mrs M and the rot set in. Having a Thai partner can make some of us lazy, you tend to let them do the talking. On our last trip to Thailand I had to request a taxi by phone - 100% Thai - in the end, I did it easily enough but I was so nervous picking up the phone because for the first time in ages I did not have Mrs M there as a fall back.

    Now keeping in mind that Mrs M will read this reply to the second part of your question


    IMO unless you both really pay attention to it - the partnership can be counter-productive to the language skills of both of you. You tend to develop your own version of "thinglish" - half half phrases that confuse both languages - "key mai?" as we leave the house means "Do you have the house key with you?" - overheard by a Thai it means something else.

    Finally IMHO - and no doubt this varies between couples - learning Thai from your partner directly is about as wise as a husband trying to teach his wife to drive a car. On the other hand having a Thai partner around means you overhear Thai conversations all the time and that helps keep you ears tuned to the Thai language.

    This thread is actually inspiring me to get back to work on my reading and writing Thai skills - I hate not being able to read a Thai menu or food shop sign.

    Edit in - I should add that without the basic Thai skills I had at the time we first met the relationship between Mrs M and I may not have developed the way it did.

    Enjoy
    Thanks for that Minder. I just found when I was in the village and everyone was talking Thai... I just sat with the kids and chatted with them. You learn a lot from kids as they want to help you... and they get excited when you start stringing words together and asking them questions in Thai... far easier than learning off adults! I felt like if I spent a lot of time in the village I'd learn pretty quickly... just from chatting with the kids. Of course this would just be verbal skills... not reading or writing... But away from that environment the process is far slower...
    My only experience was in a pie making factory managing the gravy team


  18. #18
    Cadet Gold giggsy's Avatar
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    I am going to try and do a post on Thai language on my blog in the next couple of weeks.
    Will try and cover tips and resources for the speaking, listening, reading and the writing of it.

    Wabbits.. Mrs W sounds like a very determined lady, full credit to her on learning a third language.
    Karaoke is also a fun way to learn some Thai songs and I can clear a room doing that, very quickly.

    Keep going justcruising 1, the demands of time are always a major hurdle. Even if you just learn one or two new words a day
    it is still very good progress. The only thing I do with time is define my 4 or 5 most important things in life
    and kick out the un-important. So I really lock in and prioritise. Obviously outside of your normal work. You will find little and often
    far less overwhelming. However we are all programmed different, so its different strokes for different folks.

    Correct Distant Peak about learning from kids, that is another great tip.
    Last edited by giggsy; 3rd April 2011 at 04:15.

  19. #19
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน G4orce's Avatar
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    In my experience learning anything I find i remember things a lot better if I am physically shown (thus the reason I wanted one on one lessons) I find the feedback is very helpful as books cannot give you this. Also from what i have been learning from books/internet I find I will set myself a small task (for example read pages 1-10) and continue to read those pages over and over for a few days. That way its sets in your mind, then continue to read these every month or so as if you are studying for your year 12 exams. This way can also get very boring and find yourself loosing interest easy so you need a happy medium.

  20. #20
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน PatongBeachBoy's Avatar
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    Giggsy, It might sound like a stupid question, but do you dream in Thai yet?.... I have heard that once you have a firm understanding of another language you start to dream in it!...

    I need to learn as I have at least 100 episodes of Thailand's got Talent to watch 555

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