Phuket Taxi and Transfers

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Thread: Up to you..

  1. #1
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
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    Up to you..

    The meaning of the Thai phrase "Up to you" (for the record, I do know it is English) has been discussed on many threads, and I always thought the different meanings of the phrase were cultural.

    While reading today, I came across a translation of "up to you" as "dtaam jai koon".
    While before I had only heard the translation of "up to you" as "Arai godai".

    Asking my friend Google to help me understand,

    "Dtaam jai koon" translates as "follow your heart"
    "Arai godai", which I should really transliterate as "arai gaae dtaae" (don't want to upset 7), translates as "whatever".

    I found a few more, like "laew dtae", which should translate as "depends on you"

    Now I am confused. Is the different use of the phrase "up to you" based on a different culture or setting, or is it just different things translated into the same English 3 words?

    Because if it is, I can surely see the difference in the answer to "what you want to do today?".
    Up to you / dtaam jai koon / follow your heart or Up to you / arai gaae dtaae / whatever...

    Any Thai insides?

  2. #2
    Lamai Beach Bum Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน bacwaan's Avatar
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    if I was saying "up to you" back to a Thai I would probably use "laew dtai khun"...seems to be commonly said and not as "loaded' as "up to you" comes across...

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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RakThai View Post
    (don't want to upset 7)
    Oh I don't think you have to worry about that 555.
    Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.


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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Moo Uaon's Avatar
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    seems to be many phrases that we have that Thais have similar. so when they learn the english version it seems to be used a lot.

    like "miss you" that is commonly used by TG's..."kit thung"...hasip hasip etc etc
    FACE YOUR FEARS LIVE YOUR DREAMS

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    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Changone's Avatar
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    ^Spot on. It's kind of like they find out the English translation, then apply a Thai phrase with as similar as possible meaning for use when talking to Falang...

  6. #6
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Chob's Avatar
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    As you know , "Up to you" itself can have a few meanings , depending on the delivery and the situation.

    Plus its never safe to assume that various Thai people will all take the same meaning from their own expressions and apply them uniformly to ours.

    My ex used "aria gedai" all the time and appeared to mean "anything" with a non-committal shrug of her shoulders ... my tg now never says that ever.

    I tend to take them all as meaning that they are leaving the decision making to me ( and Buddha help me if I get it wrong ! 555)

    Most Thais are not very "specific" people usually ...
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  7. #7
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Changone's Avatar
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    ^Once again, right on the money. Thais will always keep something in reserve, in case something blows up in your face, then there cannot possibly be any blowback on them. In English, we have past, present, and future tense.
    In Thai, its all much more general, like they have a "Time machine"..as in after an accident...."I tell you before...those brakes are worn out...".
    Last edited by Changone; 17th November 2016 at 18:50.

  8. #8
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chob View Post
    As you know , "Up to you" itself can have a few meanings , depending on the delivery and the situation.

    Plus its never safe to assume that various Thai people will all take the same meaning from their own expressions and apply them uniformly to ours.

    My ex used "aria gedai" all the time and appeared to mean "anything" with a non-committal shrug of her shoulders ... my tg now never says that ever.

    I tend to take them all as meaning that they are leaving the decision making to me ( and Buddha help me if I get it wrong ! 555)

    Most Thais are not very "specific" people usually ...
    Thai can be very specific! When it's about money or food, you will know exactly what they mean.. 555

    I think in many cases Thai are culturally not allowed to be specific.

    Kreng jai "orders" them to please and not offend you, so making a decision for you will putt them at risk of making the wrong choice and displeasing you.
    Combine that with "face" and "falang communication" (too direct) and a recipe for a possible confrontation is created.
    And although we, falang, don't fall in the Thai face / class system, we are usually older, better educated, richer. So we are entitled to make the decision. I think it is a bit un-Thai to give up that right.

    I was just surprised that the up2u in Thai is much clearer. Arai godai for whatever suggests you have to guess what they want and make that choice, where dtaam jai khun as follow your heart for me says that you should really decide on what feels good.

    Think next time a Thai uses Up2u I will just ask for the Thai translation to know how thick the ice is.. 55

  9. #9
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    They dont like arguments. Up to you means if you choose and it is crap it is your fault and you cant blame them

  10. #10
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน chelski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billyfly View Post
    They dont like arguments. Up to you means if you choose and it is crap it is your fault and you cant blame them
    That is not only limited to Thai's let me tell you, it is practiced very much by many non Thai's as well
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RakThai View Post
    The meaning of the Thai phrase "Up to you" (for the record, I do know it is English) has been discussed on many threads, and I always thought the different meanings of the phrase were cultural.

    While reading today, I came across a translation of "up to you" as "dtaam jai koon".
    While before I had only heard the translation of "up to you" as "Arai godai".

    Asking my friend Google to help me understand,

    "Dtaam jai koon" translates as "follow your heart"
    "Arai godai", which I should really transliterate as "arai gaae dtaae" (don't want to upset 7), translates as "whatever".

    I found a few more, like "laew dtae", which should translate as "depends on you"

    Now I am confused. Is the different use of the phrase "up to you" based on a different culture or setting, or is it just different things translated into the same English 3 words?



    Because if it is, I can surely see the difference in the answer to "what you want to do today?".
    Up to you / dtaam jai koon / follow your heart or Up to you / arai gaae dtaae / whatever...

    Any Thai insides?
    My take on it would be:

    "dtaam jai koon" - A little more subservient Up to you as in "I will follow your decision (bit if it's wrong, it's completely on you)"

    "Arai godai" - Up to you - as in "I couldn't really give a shit"

    "laew dtae" - Up to you as in "Your choice", usually when there are specific options.

  12. #12
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน jontymate's Avatar
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    This phrase has caused issues for me early on. The rhetorical nature and different meanings in different circumstances.

    The argument sort up to you or "what ever" ecectra

    The way around it for me is we never you that term in English.

    When I actually mean up to you. I will simply say what is your wish. That usually gets a direct answer.
    "Man cannot discover New Oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore" 
      
       
       
         
       
      
     

  13. #13
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Founding Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Changone's Avatar
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    When most of us first encounter a TG speaking English and using the phrase "Up to you" it should be considered. In the very limited circumstances in which it is delivered.

    A TG for example, can express herself freely in Thai/Lao/Khmer and be properly understood, as we very likely would during an exchange in English.

    However, in context, "Up to you" should more properly be considered to means "Payers choice".
    Or, He who pays chooses.

    The French have a saying "Noblesse Oblige" which sums it up nicely.
    Sydney and jontymate like this.

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