The best and friendliest guesthouse in Patong.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 32 of 32
Like Tree8Likes

Thread: Word a day ภาษาไทย

  1. #21
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Nomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lOZt
    Posts
    2,588
    Quote Originally Posted by Chob View Post
    "Khon som yung ( yung = rubber ) you tee nai ?" is what you ask a local when you have a flat tyre. ( Man fix rubber-tyre stays where ? )
    How often does young Som fix your rubber?
    Ian Forbes likes this.
    "Don't wait around for your life to happen to you. Find something that makes you happy and do it. Everything else is just background noise." George Mason

  2. #22
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Nomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lOZt
    Posts
    2,588
    Quote Originally Posted by MarcTwoSix View Post
    I've always liked Sok-a-bok 555
    Just tried out Sok-ga-bok on TG daughter...problem was that she was taking off her socks at the time and thought I was saying something about her socks.
    Rivo likes this.
    "Don't wait around for your life to happen to you. Find something that makes you happy and do it. Everything else is just background noise." George Mason

  3. #23
    Cadet silver
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by Chob View Post
    '
    My word to offer for today is , "Som" or "Som-San"
    Som means 'fix' or 'repair'.

    You can use it for a repair person - 'khon som'
    A mechanic becomes "khon som rot' , electrician "khon som fai" etc
    The word has no special inflexion.
    "Khon som yung ( yung = rubber ) you tee nai ?" is what you ask a local when you have a flat tyre. ( Man fix rubber-tyre stays where ? )
    I'm not sure I would completely agree with that. A tradesman is always (in my experience) called a Chang e.g. Chang fai - electrician, Chang mai - carpenter, Chang kruang - mechanic. Roadside signs for shops that fix tyres always say Puh Yang, and that seems to be all over the country.

    Thais would probably understand what you meant and be too polite to correct you. Fortunately (or unfortunately), I am a bad mannered prick with no such reservations.

  4. #24
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    17,634
    Quote Originally Posted by Buksida View Post
    I'm not sure I would completely agree with that. A tradesman is always (in my experience) called a Chang e.g. Chang fai - electrician, Chang mai - carpenter, Chang kruang - mechanic. Roadside signs for shops that fix tyres always say Puh Yang, and that seems to be all over the country.

    Thais would probably understand what you meant and be too polite to correct you. Fortunately (or unfortunately), I am a bad mannered prick with no such reservations.
    Do you say the same way as Elephant?

    PS....I've literally met one farang in the 15yrs I've been with my wife that she felt spoke Thai she could totally understand

    Hell even at her US Visa interview the guy at the Consulate was a big Thailand fan and tried to ask the interview questions in Thai
    She had to politely ask him to speak English 5555

    But I would imagine with your experience you are fluent or pretty damn near?
    Last edited by MarcTwoSix; 7th December 2018 at 18:55.

  5. #25
    Lamai Beach Bum Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน bacwaan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Samui
    Posts
    8,256
    ^ I had a pair of shoes repaired recently..I asked the guy if he knew his "title" in english..he was rather bemused when i told him "Cobbler"...kept saying "cobra....ngoo" over and again to himself and laughing...

    When I asked him his title in Thai he said..."khon saawm rawng thao" คนซ่อมรองเท้า..which I thought made sense..."person repair shoe"...

  6. #26
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Moo Uaon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    เชียงใหม่
    Posts
    18,735
    "Ling nam an" .... grease monkey?
    FACE YOUR FEARS LIVE YOUR DREAMS

  7. #27
    Cadet silver
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by MarcTwoSix View Post
    Do you say the same way as Elephant?
    The tones are different (ช่าง vs ช้าง). I am pretty much tone deaf so have to rely on context to get the message across.

    I don't know about my Thai ability. I have never had a lesson but, like just about everybody else, started with bar Thai and then working as a contractor with Thai crews with no English for over 40 years. I always use Thai at work.

    I am noticing a funny thing with old age: the part of your brain that remembers things like names must be the same part where foreign languages learned as an adult are stored. I am now frequently left grasping for a word that I know and can't bring it to mind.

    My recall ability increases with alcohol consumption, so there is hope.

  8. #28
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Chob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    16,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Buksida View Post
    I'm not sure I would completely agree with that. A tradesman is always (in my experience) called a Chang e.g. Chang fai - electrician, Chang mai - carpenter, Chang kruang - mechanic. Roadside signs for shops that fix tyres always say Puh Yang, and that seems to be all over the country.

    Thais would probably understand what you meant and be too polite to correct you. Fortunately (or unfortunately), I am a bad mannered prick with no such reservations.
    Deciding that ALL Thais say a word because thats what we've heard is a mistake we have both made on the word for repairman it appears..

    "Chang" is not commonly used down here by locals where I am ( Im in Phuket and NST ) .

    Clearly "som" ( bacwaans "sawm" ) is not used up your way... my mistake.

    bacwaan ( lives in Samui ) :
    "When I asked him his title in Thai he said..."khon saawm rawng thao" คนซ่อมรองเท้า..which I thought made sense..."person repair shoe".


    https://www.google.com/search?q=engl...hrome&ie=UTF-8 Enter 'repair' on this , and the answer is ซ่อมแซม ( sawmsaen)

    I see threads like this serving to add to and enlarge our vocab and explore possibilities ... we are all aware that there is more than one word for many things in most languages - and that Thailand also has distinct dialects.

    But I will try to remember "Chang" as well...Kaptain Rob has already made us aware in his building threads that Chang is commonly used on his building projects in CM.
    Last edited by Chob; 8th December 2018 at 02:25.

  9. #29
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Chob View Post
    Deciding that ALL Thais say a word because thats what we've heard is a mistake we have both made on the word for repairman it appears..

    "Chang" is not commonly used down here by locals where I am ( Im in Phuket and NST ) .

    Clearly "som" ( bacwaans "sawm" ) is not used up your way... my mistake.

    bacwaan ( lives in Samui ) :
    "When I asked him his title in Thai he said..."khon saawm rawng thao" คนซ่อมรองเท้า..which I thought made sense..."person repair shoe".


    https://www.google.com/search?q=engl...hrome&ie=UTF-8 Enter 'repair' on this , and the answer is ซ่อมแซม ( sawmsaen)

    I see threads like this serving to add to and enlarge our vocab and explore possibilities ... we are all aware that there is more than one word for many things in most languages - and that Thailand also has distinct dialects.

    But I will try to remember "Chang" as well...Kaptain Rob has already made us aware in his building threads that Chang is commonly used on his building projects in CM.
    To resolve, or add to, the confusion, I tried to discuss this with the TG, from Lopburi..

    Her take is that "chang" is a constructor, who builds something from scratch..
    The word for "repair" is "sorm saem" and the person who does the repairing can be either "chang sorm" if he does it from scratch, takes responsibility for it,
    Or "sorm" when he comes to fix someone another person has installed or created...

  10. #30
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    9,711
    Quote Originally Posted by Chob View Post
    'gra-jok' - said a tad longer , means 'mirror'.

    Ive always like the sound of 'sok-a-brok' as well ... tho' some Thais drop the 'r'.

    Another one that rolls off the tongue is , "Alai Kanak-kanarr ?!" which I can only get a rough translation of , but certainly gives off the feeling that you mean ,

    "What the hell is going on here ??"

    I use it when I come home and the Thai Lady and Grand Daughter are going at it ...55
    It usually makes them stop immediately .. or sometimes bust out laughing.

    My word to offer for today is , "Som" or "Som-San"
    Som means 'fix' or 'repair'.

    You can use it for a repair person - 'khon som'
    A mechanic becomes "khon som rot' , electrician "khon som fai" etc
    The word has no special inflexion.
    "Khon som yung ( yung = rubber ) you tee nai ?" is what you ask a local when you have a flat tyre. ( Man fix rubber-tyre stays where ? )
    The other thing the Tg asked me is "please not use 'Alai kanak kanarr' with my family.. bargirls making fun of you, is alright.." 555

  11. #31
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Chob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    16,799
    Quote Originally Posted by RakThai View Post
    To resolve, or add to, the confusion, I tried to discuss this with the TG, from Lopburi..

    Her take is that "chang" is a constructor, who builds something from scratch..
    The word for "repair" is "sorm saem" and the person who does the repairing can be either "chang sorm" if he does it from scratch, takes responsibility for it,
    Or "sorm" when he comes to fix someone another person has installed or created...
    Makes sense .. I guess Ive got a tad sidetracked as my 'word of the day ' was "som saen" or "som" meaning to repair.

  12. #32
    Cadet silver
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    149
    I find Southern Thai the hardest of the 4 major regional dialects to pick up. I have been to all the southern provinces except Narathiwat and worked for extended periods (months at a time) in Nakhon, Songkhla, Surat, Trang and Satun. We picked up a few locals when working there who have stayed with us and the other guys tease them sometimes about their Dambro. The first time I heard Yawi language I made a decision to give up immediately.

    It seems to me that it has become a lot easier over the years to communicate in central Thai when in the south, which is a good thing for most of us.

    As far as I know, the word "som" for repair is universal to all regions. All my guys, wherever they are from, refer to their positions as "Chang" (e.g. chang kruang, chang faifa, chang kleung, chang cheum, chang joh etc). Their assistants are described as poo chuay chang .... (whatever the job is). They will use "som" when describing what they are working on. This same terminology is used by the Labour Department.

    When to use "poo" or another descriptor such as "chao" is confusing and I don't know what the rule is for it. For instance a judge might be called poo dtut sin but a farmer is always called chao na and a fisherman is usually chao pramong. "Chao Pramong" usually indicates a professional fisherman to me while "kohn ha pla" (person looking for fish?) suggests an angler.

    Anyway, enough of all that bollocks, my word of the day is Prasopgarn (ประสบการณ์) = Experience - the only way I can bumble through a foreign language.
    Moo Uaon likes this.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •