Phuket Taxi and Transfers

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Solar tuk tuks?

  1. #1
    Frequent Flyer kaptainrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lannaland
    Posts
    8,672

    Solar tuk tuks?

    Nice concept ... but I can't see it catching on >



    Solar powered tuk-tuks coming to Bangkok
    Cheers, Rob.
    Lifes journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well-preserved body, but to skid in sideways totally worn out, shouting: holy s.h.i.t what a ride!

  2. #2
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,933
    Kinda on the same theme, but I am always struck at the lack of solar panels on roofs when flying into BKK.... unless they hide them very well..... I would think that they would be pretty good there

  3. #3
    Frequent Flyer kaptainrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lannaland
    Posts
    8,672
    Quote Originally Posted by dave01 View Post
    Kinda on the same theme, but I am always struck at the lack of solar panels on roofs when flying into BKK.... unless they hide them very well..... I would think that they would be pretty good there
    Solar too expensive in LOS. Electric city still cheap cheap. Our monthly a/c rec'd today is 607Bt.

    Jo noticed the panels on all QLD homes last visit. Seems you'll pay for innovation in higher electricity charges and taxes tho.
    Cheers, Rob.
    Lifes journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well-preserved body, but to skid in sideways totally worn out, shouting: holy s.h.i.t what a ride!

  4. #4
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Perth, West Oz
    Age
    37
    Posts
    10,975
    Or is that a solar panel salesman in a tuk tuk?
    Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.


  5. #5
    Frequent Flyer kaptainrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lannaland
    Posts
    8,672
    Quote Originally Posted by Bacon View Post
    Or is that a solar panel salesman in a tuk tuk?
    looks like a farang huh?
    Cheers, Rob.
    Lifes journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well-preserved body, but to skid in sideways totally worn out, shouting: holy s.h.i.t what a ride!

  6. #6
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    6,581
    confused by that article - today's date but says:

    has caught the interest of Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva
    so it may not be recent news at all

    or is the Coconuts man just confused? this story in Phnom Pnh Post yesterday

    Tuk-tuks to be solar-powered
    Australian green energy company Star 8 has designed a solar-powered tuk-tuk and is in the process of building a factory in Cambodia to make the vehicles, according to a report in Australian newspaper The Age.
    Through solar panels on the rooftop, power is sent to one battery for running the engine, and another in storage that can also be used to power household generators, the Fairfax-owned newspaper reported.
    The vehicles’ makers said the tuk-tuks will cost between A$2,000 (US$1,865) and A$3,000. A full charge can cover 120 kilometres and can reach a top speed of 50 kilometres per hour.

    From Star 8 site


    Apart from all that - I understood the three wheeled tuktuks were being phased out throughout Thailand anyway?
    They are already banned in many provinces in favour of the modified minivans

    Phuket is phasing out its current fleet in favour of these slightly bigger ones


    The Suzuki tuk-tuks, based on the Suzuki Carry cost 300,000 baht and can be modified at a total cost of about 400,000 baht, including tax.
    Monday, July 15, 2013
    PHUKET: All 1100 tuk-tuks on Phuket are being converted to the Suzuki tuk-tuk model photographed above, which is said by its driver to be the first of its kind on Phuket.

    There are at least 10 of the larger, cheaper Suzuki tuk-tuks operating now on Phuket with the Daihatsu tuk-tuks all eventually destined for the scrapyard.
    The agreement to change tuk-tuk models was signed three years ago, Khun Jaturong said. The first of the new models appeared on Phuket's streets just a few weeks ago and many more are on the way.

  7. #7
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    6,581
    [SIZE="4"]Cambodia's solar solution[/SIZE]
    3 March 2014

    Australia-based energy company Star8 officially launched operations on Friday at its solar-powered factory just outside of Phnom Penh.

    The ceremony marked the commencement of production on solar-powered tuk-tuks, the mainstay of the company.

    Hun Many, the youngest son of Premier Hun Sen, and Alison Burrows, the Australian ambassador to Cambodia, attended the event, as did representatives from Coca-Cola, which has offered to initially subsidise the cost of some of the tuk-tuks.

    “It is terrific to see people getting into energy efficiency as energy policy is very important for Cambodia,” Burrows said.

    The tuk-tuks are expected to sell for between $2,500 to $4,000 depending on size and power. On average, they will be able to travel distances of up to 120 kilometres at a top speed of 50 kph after a full charge.

    The Por Sen Chey district factory will employ up to 250 local staff and produce other solar-powered vehicles and products once it starts full-scale operations in May.


  8. #8
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Moo Uaon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    เชียงใหม่
    Posts
    18,935
    What happens in the rainy season when it's overcast and rainy?
    Night time?

    Hate to think about when all theses (worldwide) panels become throwaways/landfill in the decades-centuries to come and their PV cells start leaching into the ground.
    FACE YOUR FEARS LIVE YOUR DREAMS

  9. #9
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    6,581
    I wonder at the practicalities with that limited range; In Jan I was headed to PP airport by tuktuk the traffic was so bad I abandoned ship and found a motorbike taxi . . . while it says up to 120km at 50km/h - 2.5 hours? after full charge - how many hours at 5-20kmh would be more relevant around PP.
    Then what? Down time in evening with no sun . . . tomorrow find a sunny spot and sleep for a day till it is fully charged again?
    As opposed to a 5 minute trip to refuel
    Not disagreeing with the concept, but don't see it taking off fast in competition with the little Daelim bikes they commonly use

  10. #10
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Moo Uaon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    เชียงใหม่
    Posts
    18,935
    There's a lot of new tuk tuks around CM with a big LANNA label across the back of them. Don't know what they are but definitely quiet and no visible smoke coming from them.

    It would be good to get rid of the old smoke spewing (lack of maintenance) 2 strokes from the city and replaced with newer little 4 stroke engines..
    Last edited by Moo Uaon; 4th March 2014 at 23:47.
    FACE YOUR FEARS LIVE YOUR DREAMS

  11. #11
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Bacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Perth, West Oz
    Age
    37
    Posts
    10,975
    Quote Originally Posted by Hatari View Post
    I wonder at the practicalities with that limited range; In Jan I was headed to PP airport by tuktuk the traffic was so bad I abandoned ship and found a motorbike taxi . . . while it says up to 120km at 50km/h - 2.5 hours? after full charge - how many hours at 5-20kmh would be more relevant around PP.
    Then what? Down time in evening with no sun . . . tomorrow find a sunny spot and sleep for a day till it is fully charged again?
    As opposed to a 5 minute trip to refuel
    Not disagreeing with the concept, but don't see it taking off fast in competition with the little Daelim bikes they commonly use
    But surely, it you're spending a lot of time in traffic or going slow, then you're pretty much charging up most of the day. Should be enough to keep you going at night.
    Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.


  12. #12
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Moo Uaon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    เชียงใหม่
    Posts
    18,935
    ^ then they'd have to carry a heap of batteries around and they run down quick.
    FACE YOUR FEARS LIVE YOUR DREAMS

  13. #13
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    6,581
    ^ that's my question - is there enough charging in overcast etc
    I've been in PP several times in rain season - it is worse than any I've experienced in this country - yet we live just 300km west of PP -the ranges between cop a lot.
    The other 'catch' is of course these solar power ones are are dedicated tuktuks - which the usual Phnom Penh ones are not - they are not tuktuks in the Thai sense - just a motorbike with a towball attachment.
    Bike break down? Simply hook up to another one, or hook a trailer on for heavy haulage.

    Like this:



    solar power this one!

  14. #14
    GMT
    GMT is offline
    Cadet Bronze
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    63
    I think that last photo must have been photo-shopped .... no self-respecting Thai 'with a trailer' would ever drive/ride around without it piled high with merchandise. Anything not stacked high enough to be a danger to passing low-flying aircraft is not really trying!.

  15. #15
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    6,581
    and now, from same company, Star8, solar-charging buses

    Solar buses at the temples of Angkor
    Sat, 6 September 2014



    “The growing number of tourists annually requires a unique environmental program for the city that includes mobility management and efficient energy resource planning of transport networks,” Elirose Suarez, associate director at Sou Ching, said.

    Suarez said the ticket cost had yet to be determined, but she expected the buses to be on the road in the first quarter of 2015, once the green light was given by local authorities.

    With a price tag of $23,000 each, the new buses are fitted with solar panels on their roof tops to help charge their batteries. Charging stations that store replacement batteries, which are also charged through solar panels, are placed along bus routes for a quick change-over when the battery runs low.

    “These buses are solar-electric; no petrol required. No oil, none of these associated costs, so the running costs of this fleet are much more commercially viable than regular public transport,” Star8 managing director Jacob Maimon said.

    A fully charged battery runs for six to eight hours, and adds 90 kilometres to the distance the bus can travel Maimon said.

    Star8 began operations at its solar factory in Phnom Penh in February, churning out a range of products for export worldwide, from solar panels to solar tuk-tuks. It will expand its operations and replicate the factory – which itself is run solely on solar power – in Siem Reap.

  16. #16
    Cadet Gold luvinpatong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    400
    I'm always surprised by how non-existent solar panels are in Thailand. You'd think with it being so hot there, and sun being plentiful, that'd you see more solar panels to power A/C, etc. If I lived there, I'd definitely try to get solar panels but then again, it could be cost prohibitive.

  17. #17
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    6,581
    ^ agree; there's a link from that bus story with more info on Star8 and how their factory is entirely run on solar power

    unless there was a financial incentive though, hard to see it catching on in Thailand in near future - I don't know how much panel/s would cost for a house like the one we have here, but with monthly electric bills between 4-500 baht think it would be a long time till solar panels paid for themselves in baht saved.

    For factory, solar power runs show
    Some 1,350 solar panels, each one capable of generating 100 watts per hour of sunlight, cover the three-story building. The owners, from Australia-based technology company Star8, anticipate that in a given shift, the factory will only need about 80 per cent of the energy generated daily.

  18. #18
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Moo Uaon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    เชียงใหม่
    Posts
    18,935
    Quote Originally Posted by luvinpatong View Post
    I'm always surprised by how non-existent solar panels are in Thailand. You'd think with it being so hot there, and sun being plentiful, that'd you see more solar panels to power A/C, etc. If I lived there, I'd definitely try to get solar panels but then again, it could be cost prohibitive.
    There's a big solar farm near our house back of Nakhon Nowhere.

    You gotta remember that in the rainy season (1/2 the year) it is often very cloudy and quite often raining.

    Places that have the better climate (California,inland deserts etc) need a hell of a lot of high voltage wires to get the electricity to where it's needed and water to keep them clean and productive. Having them in the middle of habitable regions is not ideal.

    Other than that the panels are energy intensive to mine some of the exotic materials used in them,manufacture and transport. Then when they're past their use by date...where do you bury them?

    Interesting to see how productive the buses in SR will be.
    FACE YOUR FEARS LIVE YOUR DREAMS

  19. #19
    Cadet Gold luvinpatong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    400
    Quote Originally Posted by Moo Uaon View Post
    There's a big solar farm near our house back of Nakhon Nowhere.

    You gotta remember that in the rainy season (1/2 the year) it is often very cloudy and quite often raining.

    Places that have the better climate (California,inland deserts etc) need a hell of a lot of high voltage wires to get the electricity to where it's needed and water to keep them clean and productive. Having them in the middle of habitable regions is not ideal.

    Other than that the panels are energy intensive to mine some of the exotic materials used in them,manufacture and transport. Then when they're past their use by date...where do you bury them?

    Interesting to see how productive the buses in SR will be.
    I was more so referring to solar panels on private homes vs. solar farms. If I owned a home in Thailand, I would try to get solar panels on the house, if possible, to keep the A/C going

  20. #20
    Frequent Flyer kaptainrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lannaland
    Posts
    8,672
    Siam Reap is an ideal location for solar buses, good quality flat road over a short distance.

    I looked at solar panels/inverter power cost for house but the equipment is all imported and expensive in comparison to Oz.
    Cheers, Rob.
    Lifes journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well-preserved body, but to skid in sideways totally worn out, shouting: holy s.h.i.t what a ride!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •