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Thread: The Thai Elephant thread

  1. #21
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Hatari's Avatar
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    Sa Kaeo traveling elephant show

  2. #22
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    Elephant graveyard

    Attachment 14998

  3. #23
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    ^ this place?

    Elephant Graveyard At Ban Ta Klang, Surin, Thailand


    This resting place is the Elephant Graveyard at Wat Pa Arjiang in Ban Ta Klang elephant village in Surin province

    There are around 100 elephants buried at the cemetery, which has existed since 1995.

    When elephants die they can’t be buried at the cemetery right away. First they need to be buried elsewhere for 5-7 years to allow enough time for the body to decompose. The skeleton is then dug up and moved to the cemetery.
    Last edited by Hatari; 29th October 2017 at 04:57.

  4. #24
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    Family outing?
    Chanthaburi, Kaeng Hang Maeo district in the news again this week, Monday 23 October 2017, a herd of over 30 elephants on the move through local farmland, cassava crops


    source

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatari View Post
    ^ this place?

    Elephant Graveyard At Ban Ta Klang, Surin, Thailand

    Yes and as you can see from my picture the upkeep/maintenance has dropped off a lot since.

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    And here is a picture of the temple they are building at Ban Ta Klang.Attachment 15007

  7. #27
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    Seven elephants successfully rescued from a pond
    November 12, 2017 By Thai PBS

    With the help of a backhoe from the highways office of Chachoengsao, seven elephants were successfully rescued from a pond in Bang Ang Ta Poeng after they fell into the pond since about 2 am on Sunday(Nov 12).



    Mr Decha Nilvichien, chief of Khao Ang Ruenai wildlife sanctuary, said that the backhoe which arrived at Bang Ang Ta Poeng village at about 8 am dug up the soil to form a slope leading to the pond allowing the trapped elephants to walk out of the pond.

    He said that two elephants firstly walked out from the pond, then followed by one elephant after another until all the animals were out of danger at about 8.40 am.

    However, Mr Decha said a team of forest rangers was sent to follow the herd into the jungle toward Ban Noen Krabok in Tha Takiab district of Chachoengsao.

    The seven elephants, including two babies, accidentally fell into the pond as they were scouring for food in a rubber plantation in Ban Ang Ta Poeng. They were unable to get out because the embankment of the pond is steep and slippery.

    Last edited by Hatari; 13th November 2017 at 16:21.
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  8. #28
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    We all know how elephants love water and I could see exactly how that could happen, and they couldn't get out.

    I've been on my motorbike on a muddy road on BC, and when it slipped out from under me I could not even stand up. I had to crawl away from my motorbike on my hands and knees to get a stick to scrape away the worst of the slippery mud, just so I could lift the bike to an upright position again. It took me about 15 minutes or more.

  9. #29
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    Fortunately no fatalities ... early yesterday morning Sunday 12 November this Isuzu pickup hit one of three elephants from Khao Yai National Park on the road in Pak Chong, Nakhon Ratchasima


  10. #30
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    There are signs all through that park telling motorists to watch out for elephants. I had photos of the signs but lost them when my photo hosting site crashed.

    But, I don't think Thais pay much attention to signs... at least not from my observation.

  11. #31
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    Elephant parade ends in huge feast
    November 17, 2017
    The Nation
    A grand parade of 290 elephants, who were later treated to a feast of vegetables and fruits was held on Friday morning as part of “Amazing Surin Elephant” 2017, an annual festival dedicated to the pachyderms.
    The animals performed shows for a cheering crowd of Thais and foreigners, who also enjoyed cultural shows by local artists and yongsters. The magnificent elephant parade, which featured music and schoolchildren performing dances, started at 9am at the Surin railway station and ended at the Phraya Surin Phakdi Si Narong Changwang (Pum) Monument, where Surin governor Atthaporn Singhawichai presided over the opening ceremony and a ritual to worship supernatural forces.
    The event’s other highlight, spread over a 500-metre section of road, was held at the end of the parade and featured a “buffet of 50 tonnes of fruits and vegetables” for the elephants.


  12. #32
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    Nice to see everyone loving their pachyderms... all except the workers in rubber tree plantations. 55

    I love elephants, but in today's world they don't mix well with people. Having some wonderful, intelligent beast chained to the ground just breaks my heart. Most animals don't have the power to "reason", but elephants do. Most animals just react on instinct... hunt or be hunted. The lowly rat also seems able to reason and figure things out. That is why it has survived for centuries despite man trying everything to eliminate the species.

  13. #33
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    From last year, but the situatuion in Chanthaburi's Kaeng Hang Meao district hasn't changed



    FRUSTRATED HUMANS FACE OFF WITH HUNGRY ELEPHANTS
    September 8, 2016

    In the Kaeng Hang Meao district of Chanthaburi province – population 36,000 – humans are having more frequent run-ins with wild Asian elephants as development creeps further into territory that was once safe ground for the approximately 150 animals.

    The majority of people here are rubber farmers, and recent development has meant clearing more land. Due to high temperatures during the day, the elephants are most active from early evening to dawn. That makes it particularly dangerous for plantation workers who go out to harvest at night when lower temperatures make for more fluid latex. Three people here have been killed this year. Six died in 2015.


    In rubber harvesting, the latex is more easily drawn from trees in the cooler hours of the early morning. This means workers must venture out in darkness, which puts them at danger as those are also the hours the elephants are most active.


    A wildlife volunteer displays the small but extremely loud fireworks used to scare off elephants in the event of an encounter. Many villagers in Kaeng Hang Meao choose instead to use pots and pans to disperse the animals.


    It is estimated that some 150 elephants live in the area. Meanwhile more land is being cleared for development which reduces the habitable space for the animals and making it more likely encounters between elephants and people will increase.
    Last edited by Hatari; 18th November 2017 at 11:24.
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  14. #34
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    Thanks for the data and photos, Hatari. Kind of sad to see, and especially when most farmer/workers are just trying to survive themselves. It is pretty easy to be high and mighty about conservation for wild animals when you already have enough money and food to do what you want.

  15. #35
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    ^ the land they're clearing, if it's not officially national park land (I hope not) then it is 'jungle' on the fringes of the national park . . . rubber plantations continue to expand into the elephants 'home' area . . . little wonder they have trouble with 'invading elephants'

  16. #36
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    Like many tourists, first time I saw elephants in Thailand they were 'tamed' for tourist use, these pics from Phuket 2009

    Between Nai Harn and Kata
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  17. #37
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    Statue at Samet Ngam, Chanthaburi River

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  18. #38
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    The first part is a note I wrote, 4 July 2013 when we heard/saw this baby elephant in our street

    An Elephant at The Door
    I don’t like, and don’t support, these people with young elephants; ask where they got the elephant … the only way is by having killed the mother. There have been many stories in the news of this lately with mature female carcasses found in National Parks.
    We could hear this young elephant howling in pain well before we could see it; being ‘trained’ by repeated blows to the head with that steel-spiked stick. They go door-to-door, begging for money to feed the elephant - reality is it is a profitable business and babies sell for 900,000 to one million baht (in perspective, can buy two new Toyota cars for that).



    *****

    Thailand’s baby elephant trade

    23 February 2012
    The discovery of 6 slaughtered elephants last month in two of Thailand’s national parks (Kaeng Krachan and Kiu Buri) has exposed a nasty secret about the country’s ubiquitous elephant tourism industry.


    Dutch national Edwin Wiek, founder of the Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand, jumped on the wild elephants’ gruesome demise to draw attention to a lucrative trade in baby elephants that has been carried out with the seeming compliance of government officials. In an article titled Thai Elephants Are Being Killed for Tourist Dollars published in The Nation newspaper on January 24, Wiek said that the six elephants had been killed to get their babies, not for elephant meat and ivory as claimed by government officials. He argued that the incident demonstrated that the trade in baby pachyderms was no longer just a cross-border business with Myanmar, but that poachers were now targeting Thailand’s own depleted herd of fewer than 2,000 wild elephants. Based on his own investigations, Wiek estimates that two to three baby elephants are poached from the wild per week.
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  19. #39
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    Thankfully, the authorities finally stopped the "tourist elephants" that used to be taken into Chiang Mai at night, to the city's tourist areas such as Loi kroh road.

  20. #40
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    A year ago this baby elephant was in the news, it was caught in a poachers trap, found and rescued by people from Khaeng Hang Maew, Chanthaburi. Couldn't find any update on which sanctuary it was sent to



    The three-month-old animal appeared to have been badly injured by a trap when it was found by Moo 12 chief Wandee Dokdin and four other village people. Khao Ang Rue Nai Wildlife Sanctuary chief, Decha Nilvichian believes that it might have been trapped for three days.
    The baby elephant was carried to the Chachoengsao wildlife office via a truck on Thursday where its injuries were treated by local veterinarians.
    Officials have been watching over and feeding Jam in the sanctuary and will continue to provide 24-hour care to it. A wildlife official has said that the baby is now recovering and becoming healthier but a surrogate mother is still important for natural feeding so it can achieve optimal development. The group has been busy searching animal sanctuaries throughout Thailand for a mother.

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