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Thread: The Thai Elephant thread

  1. #161
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
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    Seeking peace with the pachyderms

    From The Nation today
    July 21, 2018

    Shrinking Thai forests have led to increased elephant-human conflict, while researchers explore ways to co-exist in harmony.

    With Thailand's forestland shrinking over recent decades, conflicts between humans and wild elephants have become increasingly visible – and sometimes deadly. A few decades ago, Thais rarely saw the shy lumbering beasts as a threat. But these days, scenes of wild elephants ravaging farmland, crashing into houses, confronting people and frightening motorists are increasingly commonplace.


    Nine wild elephants cross a road inside the Khao Yai National Park, delighting passing tourist who quickly snap a picture of the huge mammal. Officials are on standby to ensure there are no confrontations between humans and wild pachyderms.

    Statistics reveal that human-elephant conflicts have caused casualties on both sides between 2012 and 2018. There were 107 human and elephant victims over the period, resulting in deaths and injuries. Humans were the victims in 75 of these cases.

    In 1961, forests covered an estimated 273,628 square kilometres of Thailand. In 2011, Thai forests had dwindled to 171,586 square kilometres.

    Each elephant needs an area of at least 100 square kilometres to ensure sufficient food. The gentle giants forage over a six-square-kilometre area each day. But when wild elephants run out of food in the available forest, they have no choice but to step beyond.

    “Conflicts are most intense in Chachoengsao, Chanthaburi, Prachin Buri and Kanchanaburi,” Pichet explains.

    Research has documented a rapid rise in the number of communities raided by wild elephants in these provinces in recent years. The provinces encompass the country’s so-called Eastern Forest Zone, where wild elephants are pushing on into new ranges after about 18 months. Elsewhere, it takes between three to 11 years for wild elephants to start venturing out further in search of food.

    Full article here
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  2. #162
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    Ian Forbes likes this.

  3. #163
    Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
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    At Wat Bangchalongnok, Samut Prakan, Bangkok




  4. #164
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
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    I do like Thailand's love and respect for the great pachyderm. Conflicts are bound to happen...
    It is the same as with grizzly bears in western Canada. Black bears will adjust to living around humans, but not so with grizzlies. Same as the difference between wolves and coyotes. Coyotes are quite happy living around humans... and eating the human's cats and dogs. Not so with wolves. Wolves try to stay away from humans if they can.

  5. #165
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    I'm on the side of 'cruel' for this one

    ELEPHANT SWIMMING SHOW IS EXERCISE, NOT CRUEL: ZOO
    August 28, 2018



    CHONBURI — A young elephant walks on its hind legs and swims in a glass tank to the delight of a crush of students watching and cheering.

    To the animal rights advocates who yesterday posted a video of the swimming elephant, it was cruelty. Today the director of the Khao Kheow Open Zoo defended the spectacle as an innocent form of exercise.

    “The show is considered exercise for the elephants. Normally they go into pools to play with water anyway,” said zoo director Attaporn Sriheran. “The zoo then designed another pool for the elephants to swim and at the same time allows children and visitors to learn about their behavior as well.”

    Animal shows were held as usual today at the zoo located southeast of Bangkok in Chonburi province, despite being criticized by the Los Angeles-based animal advocacy group the day before in a one-minute clip that drew broad criticism on the internet.

    Attaporn said claims the elephant was hurt by a mahout were untrue, and that the show involved normal elephant activity.

    He then said elephants and mahouts are like “bread and butter,” and take care of each other. Animal rights groups such as PETA say conditioning captive elephants to perform requires physical abuse to break their spirits.

    Attaporn also criticized World Animal News for “damaging Thailand’s reputation” by reporting the story.
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  6. #166
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    Like to know how easy it was for the elephant to leave the water if it wanted to?
    My only experience was in a pie making factory managing the gravy team


  7. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Distantpeak View Post
    Like to know how easy it was for the elephant to leave the water if it wanted to?
    There in lies the crux of the matter. Those under water photos do not show that, but I'm sure the pool must have steps leading into and out of the pool. I do know that elephants love the water and will stay in it for hours.


    Elephants do have trouble coming up steep slippery slopes, but in nature they do have there trails to and from water. It s only when man screws up the environment they live in that there are troubles.
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