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Thread: Paddy Burning - More science to it than you think?

  1. #1
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    Paddy Burning - More science to it than you think?

    Found this article interesting in local news
    Didn't realise the additional benefits of getting rid of pests, I thought it was to refresh the soil with the ash.

    The science behind crop stubble burning
    Jeremy Talbot

    Jeremy Talbot, South Canterbury Federated Farmers Arable section chairman, says the ability for farmers to continue to burn is one that is both environmentally sustainable and is also an economic necessity.
    JOHN BISSET/STUFF
    Jeremy Talbot, South Canterbury Federated Farmers Arable section chairman, says the ability for farmers to continue to burn is one that is both environmentally sustainable and is also an economic necessity.
    Crop stubble burning is an integral part of farming operations for both environmental and economic reasons writes Jeremy Talbot, the arable section chairman of South Canterbury Federated Farmers.

    OPINION: Stubble and other crop residue burning is carried out each year in the summer months by farmers as an essential part of their normal farming operations and now seems to bring out a number of uninformed comments on why it should be banned. This is usually because of some other event such as Environment Canterbury (ECan) smoke plan in the towns or another fire somewhere.

    One of the areas of confusion is the term permitted season, this is not a ban. It is the ability for Fire and Emergency NZ (Fenz) to know who and how much stubble is to be burnt and applies to any other fire. The permitting process has conditions on it including texting Fenz when burning so as not to cause a lot of false call outs for the fire brigades from ill informed public.

    Jeremy Talbot in a burnt off paddock which he says quickly clears the ground and renders almost all weed seeds, fungal pathogens and other pest eggs, dead.
    JOHN BISSET/STUFF
    Jeremy Talbot in a burnt off paddock which he says quickly clears the ground and renders almost all weed seeds, fungal pathogens and other pest eggs, dead.
    The ability for farmers to continue to burn is one that is both environmentally sustainable and also an economic necessity for the following reasons. Man has used fire as a land management tool since we first learned how to make a fire thousands of years ago. Most of Canterbury was cleared by fire around 1000 yrs ago.

    Burning the stubble quickly clears the ground and renders almost all weed seeds, fungal pathogens and other pest eggs, dead. To date with NZ farmers continuing to burn, it now sees NZ in a unique place of having little or any chemical resistant weed and crop seeds to deal with therefore significantly reducing the chemical loading on our soils and plants. This also sees NZ farmers being asked to do seed multiplication for many overseas companies because of our ability to control the weeds etc.

    We have fungal diseases such as tan spot and others for which there is no treatment and there are also some insects such as Hessian fly which lays its eggs in the straw and then attacks the following crop once hatched which also has no chemical control. To control these types of pests, the only solution is to burn the straw

    Some years ago, UK researchers from Crop and Food research at Lincoln conducted trials to look at the emissions from burning versus cultivating and ploughing in the straw. This showed clearly that the burning, while at times could be having a nuisance value, had the lowest environmental impact.

    The methane produced and released by the decomposing straw when incorporated in to the soil caused a significant increase in Green House Gas levels and the fossil fuels used to mulch and cultivate the straw to allow planting of the next crop was over double that of the burnt stubbles.

    A trial around 7 years ago at Makikihi run by the Foundation of Arable Research (Far) also compared crop results from chopped and spread stubble, baled stubble (both as in like the UK) and a burnt plot. The burnt plots were all significantly better and required a lot less chemical and tractor hours.

    Ann Dennison captured these images of a smokey haze over Waimate on March 4, 2019.
    ANN DENNISON
    Ann Dennison captured these images of a smokey haze over Waimate on March 4, 2019.
    In the countries such a UK where burning was banned in the 1980s the farmers are paid environmental subsidies to help cover these extra costs and all paid for by the urban tax payers.

    They now have a huge issue with chemical resistance with the need for a constant stream of new chemicals to try to keep ahead of the resistance factor that has developed in both weed seeds and fungal diseases. This has now become such a battle that rotational burning is now being considered as an option as the chemical solutions are becoming harder to find.

    Australian farmers who also don't burn, now have grass weeds that are resistant to 5 chemical groups including Roundup making it almost uneconomic to grow many crops in many areas now.

    Smoke from a burnoff south-west of Pleasant Point on March 4, 2019.
    MYTCHALL BRANSGROVE/STUFF
    Smoke from a burnoff south-west of Pleasant Point on March 4, 2019.
    The extra baits required to also counter the higher slug populations that thrive in the rotting straw has also reached crisis levels in the UK and Europe with strict controls on its use as it's now being detected in both water and grain. Burning destroys a lot of the slug eggs which are laid on or near the surface often completely eliminating the need for slug bait.

    Farmers do have a responsibility to meet certain criteria when lighting the fires at any time and providing these are met in a responsible and considerate manner, then burning will allow NZ to continue to have some of the safest food on the planet.

    Most farmers certainly would not have condoned the burning at midday on Sunday on the eastern side of Waimate and those farmers will be spoken to about their responsibilities as community members.

    Smoke from a burnoff south-west of Pleasant Point on March 4, 2019.
    MYTCHALL BRANSGROVE/STUFF
    Smoke from a burnoff south-west of Pleasant Point on March 4, 2019.
    Federated farmers are also looking at a review of the "Code of Practice for Burning".

    Waimate does have an issue with its location in that it has the hills behind it which tends to cause an inversion layer above the town which stops the smoke rising and dissipating. This is not the farmers fault as it is hard to know when it's there and is only really identifiable after a fire is lit.

    To put things in perspective, one researcher has calculated that based on Auckland's daily fuel usage and the area of stubble burn in Canterbury, if all the stubbles were burnt on one day then the total GHG emissions would be less that the Auckland's traffic emissions for one day. Canterbury's area of cereal crops has reduced by around 50% of that grown 20 years ago as well but complaints have risen I suspect due to winter wood burning restrictions.

    People just need to realise that in the rural area, sometimes things aren't as idyllic as they thought they may have been before moving to it and, must always remember that it is a working environment, but overall, they are way better than in most big urban environments but a little tolerance and communication is sometimes a better way of dealing with things.

    Stuff

  2. #2
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
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    After I met my GF in 2014 I have been talking to her and her brother (the farmer) about the burning of their sugar canes before harvesting.
    Unexpectedly her brother agreed with me right away and was very willing to try the unburned harvesting..
    Not because of environmental issues, but just because the burning will reduce 20-30% of the harvested weight, thus income..

    Now cutting the sugar canes unburned is more difficult, requires more labor and is more costly, but in the end it is slightly more profitable..
    Same time, the risks for the people cutting the sugar canes is much higher, sugar cane leave allergies are very common and snakes provide a far bigger risk.

    After 4 years of harvesting this way, the annual fishing expedition in the water reservoir after irrigation has become very dangerous, many snakes and other things have made the mud-fishing tricky..
    This year, thanks to a negligent neighbor, they had their sugar canes burned again..
    So maybe we can have some mud-fishing again..

    For health and safety reasons I don't participate, but it's fun to watch.. 555

  3. #3
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    bloody hell -one minuit it's shagging and marrying thai prozzies the next burning stubble-- anyone got any info on sick bufalows?-or sick thai's in general

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    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
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    Before I opened the thread I thought it was about torturing the Irish.

  5. #5
    Cadet silver Chilli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notorius View Post
    Before I opened the thread I thought it was about torturing the Irish.
    Paddy's burn real good, maybe it's all the accelerant they use that helps.

  6. #6
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    It's better if Paddy dies before they cremate him, although some would say he had it coming.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldfella View Post
    bloody hell -one minuit it's shagging and marrying thai prozzies the next burning stubble-- anyone got any info on sick bufalows?-or sick thai's in general
    My Thai girl friend was sick for 4 years before she died painfully. Is that enough suffering for you?
    Oldmanemu likes this.

  8. #8
    Cadet silver Chilli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldfella View Post
    bloody hell -one minuit it's shagging and marrying thai prozzies the next burning stubble-- anyone got any info on sick bufalows?-or sick thai's in general
    Not sure what this is about, but most sick buffaloes in Thailand can't be helped.

    Thailand is no place for sick buffaloes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TLandHim View Post
    Found this article interesting in local news
    Didn't realise the additional benefits of getting rid of pests, I thought it was to refresh the soil with the ash.

    The science behind crop stubble burning
    Jeremy Talbot
    Fire has always been natures way of cleansing. Loggers did a slash burn after taking out all the marketable trees. But, they've pretty much stopped that practice because people don't like smoke.

    When I can get away with it, I always try to burn my composted soil for the garden. The only problem is if there is any smoke then some fucking neighbour calls the fire department. They've come to my place twice and I don't want to risk it again.

  10. #10
    Foundation Member Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Minder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notorius View Post
    Before I opened the thread I thought it was about torturing the Irish.
    Torturing? I thought "Oh good, we have finally found a use for them - firewood." 555
    TLandHim likes this.
    Life is the unexpected ...

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    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minder View Post
    Torturing? I thought "Oh good, we have finally found a use for them - firewood." 555
    Well we are thick as two short planks.
    Minder and TLandHim like this.

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    Frequent Flyer kaptainrob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notorius View Post
    Well we are thick as two short planks.
    Present company excepted.
    Cheers, Rob.
    Lifes journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well-preserved body, but to skid in sideways totally worn out, shouting: holy s.h.i.t what a ride!

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    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chilli View Post
    Not sure what this is about, but most sick buffaloes in Thailand can't be helped.

    Thailand is no place for sick buffaloes.
    You are new chili
    Andy used to come to Thailand quite a lot
    Really awkward looking fella but used to be a fun guy

    He now lost all his money and can't afford to come
    So he gets blacked out drunk and instead of whacking off to porn he comes on these forums and makes these remarks wishing he was more intelligent so he could have made more money in life to be able to still go to Thailand

    Oh and he used to get black out drunk when he came to Thailand but I guess he was happy back then(you know, because he could afford to go to Thailand) so he was fun to hang out with it

  14. #14
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน RakThai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcTwoSix View Post
    You are new chili
    Andy used to come to Thailand quite a lot
    Really awkward looking fella but used to be a fun guy

    He now lost all his money and can't afford to come
    So he gets blacked out drunk and instead of whacking off to porn he comes on these forums and makes these remarks wishing he was more intelligent so he could have made more money in life to be able to still go to Thailand

    Oh and he used to get black out drunk when he came to Thailand but I guess he was happy back then(you know, because he could afford to go to Thailand) so he was fun to hang out with it
    You're from the streets.. No one ever told you not to kick people when they are down?
    sidvicious likes this.

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