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Thread: Falang or Farang?

  1. #41
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notorius View Post
    One of the most embarrassing things that ever happened me was when I came home from a month long trip. I had literally spent every day speaking pigeon English and remarkably all the tags understood every word I said. First day back at work I was represent an obviously innocent man in court. Probably still jet lagged I was giving the opening defense and about 5 minutes in I tried to put forward his alibi. I proceeded to say “ my friend stay home number 5’ everyone turned around as if I was a moron. The next thing to come out of my mouth was inexplicably ‘him good man have good heart’. It was the most embarrassing situation ever. Sounded as if I had been hit across the head with a shovel.
    I stopped speaking pidgeon English to my wife and especially writing pidgeon English about 3 years into knowing her.

    I figured speak properly and write properly and let her figure it out.

    She has always been good about asking how to say or wrote things


    I will speak slowly at times for her......simply because I speak fast anyways
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  2. #42
    Organic AI Quarky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notorius View Post
    One of the most embarrassing things that ever happened me was when I came home from a month long trip. I had literally spent every day speaking pigeon English and remarkably all the tags understood every word I said. First day back at work I was represent an obviously innocent man in court. Probably still jet lagged I was giving the opening defense and about 5 minutes in I tried to put forward his alibi. I proceeded to say “ my friend stay home number 5’ everyone turned around as if I was a moron. The next thing to come out of my mouth was inexplicably ‘him good man have good heart’. It was the most embarrassing situation ever. Sounded as if I had been hit across the head with a shovel.
    But Joe, did you get him off? ..55
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    My only experience was in a pie making factory managing the gravy team


  3. #43
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Stillearly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Distantpeak View Post
    But Joe, did you get him off? ..55
    happy ending ?
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  4. #44
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน Stillearly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcTwoSix View Post
    I stopped speaking pidgeon English to my wife and especially writing pidgeon English about 3 years into knowing her.

    I figured speak properly and write properly and let her figure it out.

    She has always been good about asking how to say or wrote things


    I will speak slowly at times for her......simply because I speak fast anyways
    pidgin , write ... hope you were more careful when teaching her
    Last edited by Stillearly; 1st February 2018 at 04:16.
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  5. #45
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stillearly View Post
    pidgin , write ... hope you were more careful when teaching her
    I am careful when teaching my wife and with clients who pay me..........anyone else, I could not give a rats ass

    Full disclosure............I may not be that careful with my wife 555
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  6. #46
    BunnyGee
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    In my experience, it all depends on the company in which you find yourself.

    We English are equally guilty of such differentiation in pronunciation (think of the word "bath" which our upper class pronounce "hearth" whereas our lower classes will pronounce as "math".

    I've yet to meet a Thai who can not pronounce the letter "r", when they choose to. In fact they can usually roll their "r's" like a Spaniard, when called upon (far better than I can).

    But the only Thai's I know who regularly pronounce words containing an "r" correctly are usually uppity, pretentiously posh individuals who are laughed at behind their backs by other Thais.

    If you mix in Hi-So Thai circles, the "r's" are generally used but in "common" parlance, the "r" is substituted with an "l" (often almost as a statement of their being a "real" Thai).

    It's quite interesting to note that if you introduce the average Thai person to a new word with a dominant "l" in it, they will almost invariably repeat the word back to you incorrectly, in substituting the "l" with a ruddy "R". What's THAT all about - LOL?

    It should also be remembered that Thais make and hear sounds we are not even capable of hearing or making......... and vice-versa. Such makes it extremely difficult for us to speak Thai "like a native"....... or equally vice-versa.

    This also goes for colours. We see them differently - especially greens and blues (but others, too). My lass is incapable of seeing orange (orange is always either red or yellow, depending on the intensity of its orangeness) and we have each given up arguing over what is green or blue.

    So, if you are in posh company and wish to assimilate, say "farang" but if you are with the majority of Thai people and wish to blend in, say "falang". Such will help you to retain "face", in either scenario.
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  7. #47
    BunnyGee
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    I never go to LOS for less than a month and live pretty much in a Thai environment, only speaking with Westerners when I go to town.

    For days and days, after my return, I am saying "Mai ow kap", "Ow kap", "tao lai kap?" "kop khun kap" etc., to shop cashiers etc.

    Plus, my grown up kids will sometimes say "Dad, can you stop speaking friggin' pidgin English to me, please?"

  8. #48
    BunnyGee
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcTwoSix View Post
    A westerners has never heard of the word before......he goes to Thailand and hears people calling him "falang"
    Why would he be wrong to then use it that way? Since his initiation to the word is "falang"

    If the proper word is farang, which many on here don't even seem to know for absolute sure.....but the locals use falang

    I figure you can use both

    To compare
    Many Thais insert an N when a word has an L sound near the end
    Like Hospital=Hospitan
    Like Bottle=Botten
    I've noticed this, too.

    But had noticed, yet not noted, it - until your post. Thanks.

    My teelak (or should that be "teerak") says "skoooon" when she means "school".

    But she also says "bridge" for "beach". Thais often pronounce an "r" before an "e" when speaking English (so much for their supposed inability to vocalise an "r", I guess).

    I spent two weeks of my holiday calling my Thai niece the Thai word for "Urine" but, to me, I was pronouncing her name EXACTLY the same way they all were but they were clearly including a sound I could neither make nor even hear, when saying it.

    All you can do is your best with the Thai language - which is appreciated by them - and vice-versa.

  9. #49
    Cadet Gold
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    Thai language has certain protocols for the pronunciation of letters at the end of a consonant or word. Endings such as the Thai equivalent of an "l" or an "r" are always pronounced as an "n". An example is Chonburi, which is actually spelled in Thai as Cholburi and appears this way on some road signs. When Thais mispronounce words in English it could be because they are thinking of the written word.

    Similarly, words ending in the equivalent of "d" or "s" are (correctly) pronounced as a "t".

    As far as "farang" or "falang", my observation is that this is something of a regional thing. People educated in Bangkok, Southern or Northern Thailand, seem to have no trouble with "farang" and normally use it. As soon as I hear "falang" spoken, I suspect I am talking to someone with an Issan background.

  10. #50
    phaisan
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyGee View Post
    But the only Thai's I know who regularly pronounce words containing an "r" correctly are usually uppity, pretentiously posh individuals who are laughed at behind their backs by other Thais.

    If you mix in Hi-So Thai circles, the "r's" are generally used but in "common" parlance, the "r" is substituted with an "l" (often almost as a statement of their being a "real" Thai).
    Rubbish, do you think the locals where I live pronounce the province they live in as Bulilam or Buriram.

    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyGee View Post
    It's quite interesting to note that if you introduce the average Thai person to a new word with a dominant "l" in it, they will almost invariably repeat the word back to you incorrectly, in substituting the "l" with a ruddy "R". What's THAT all about - LOL?
    They only Thai's to have issues with "R's" are Lao-Thais, as there is no "R" sound in the Lao language.

  11. #51
    phaisan
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyGee View Post
    I never go to LOS for less than a month and live pretty much in a Thai environment, only speaking with Westerners when I go to town.
    Wow, really a whole month at a time. 555

    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyGee View Post
    For days and days, after my return, I am saying "Mai ow kap", "Ow kap", "tao lai kap?" "kop khun kap" etc., to shop cashiers etc.

    Plus, my grown up kids will sometimes say "Dad, can you stop speaking friggin' pidgin English to me, please?"
    I agree with your kids, stop the pidgin English you have only been in Thailand a month.

  12. #52
    phaisan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buksida View Post
    As far as "farang" or "falang", my observation is that this is something of a regional thing. People educated in Bangkok, Southern or Northern Thailand, seem to have no trouble with "farang" and normally use it. As soon as I hear "falang" spoken, I suspect I am talking to someone with an Issan background.
    I agree I think it's the Lao (northern isan) issue with "R"'s that causes the problem.

  13. #53
    BunnyGee
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    Quote Originally Posted by phaisan View Post
    Wow, really a whole month at a time. 555

    I agree with your kids, stop the pidgin English you have only been in Thailand a month.
    Are you stalking me?

  14. #54
    phaisan
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyGee View Post
    Are you stalking me?
    You're not very bright, are you?

  15. #55
    BunnyGee
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    Quote Originally Posted by phaisan View Post
    You're not very bright, are you?
    Cute enough to spot a Troll.

    Now fuck off.

  16. #56
    phaisan
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    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyGee View Post
    Cute enough to spot a Troll.

    Now fuck off.
    You mean out of the thread that I started, before you joined so I could stalk you 555

  17. #57
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน MarcTwoSix's Avatar
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    Well the thing is......

    If you go home and speak pidgin English......yes that is cringeworthy

    And the thing is.....it doesn't just reflect on you
    It reflects on all guys involved with Thai girls.

    It makes us all look stupid and sets up a stereotype.

    In the beginning of my relationship I definitely spoke pidgin English as a necessity because my wife knew very little English

    But after a few years in......I always speak and write properly (well as properly as I can 5555) with my wife.


    Going back to the subject of the thread.....I don't see a big deal in how you pronounce it.
    But yes.....when I meet guys in Vancouver that are involved with TG's and they are speaking pidgin English.....they sound like idiots

  18. #58
    Uber Star Soi wanderer Thai Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน supersub's Avatar
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    I use it occasionally, but only as a last resort where I can't ask or respond to something in Thai.

    Have to say that courtroom scene Notorious described sounded funny as fk. What I wouldn't give to have been a fly on the wall as he was saying that. 555

  19. #59
    ประเทศไทยเพื่อน Uber Dreamer ผู้เพ้อฝัน
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    Quote Originally Posted by Distantpeak View Post
    But Joe, did you get him off? ..55
    Never lost a case, but also would have been scared if I did. He actually looked me when I said that and I could see him thinking is this lad for real. He said he would have got me hit if I lost but he also said he thought I was trying to get the jury to like me by pretending I was simple. I never corrected him because I was actually scared for my life.
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  20. #60
    BunnyGee
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcTwoSix View Post
    Well the thing is......

    If you go home and speak pidgin English......yes that is cringeworthy

    And the thing is.....it doesn't just reflect on you
    It reflects on all guys involved with Thai girls.

    It makes us all look stupid and sets up a stereotype.

    In the beginning of my relationship I definitely spoke pidgin English as a necessity because my wife knew very little English

    But after a few years in......I always speak and write properly (well as properly as I can 5555) with my wife.


    Going back to the subject of the thread.....I don't see a big deal in how you pronounce it.
    But yes.....when I meet guys in Vancouver that are involved with TG's and they are speaking pidgin English.....they sound like idiots
    I agree. I cringe, myself. But my Thai is poor and the company I keep in Thailand's grasp of English is even poorer.

    After a month, I'm even thinking and dreaming in pidgin English. LOL

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