A little from the Thai Farm.

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
There is no way in hell I'd swim in there


But great pictures and always adding great stuff as usual Hatari
 

1080

Well-known member


Car for cut cow 555
You know what I mean, around 3 rai for family consumption.
 

jontymate

Active member
Hatari;215318 said:
^ No, nothing's 'mine' !
But I do share in the proceeds.
I liken it to the Sopranos at times. 'Family business' and just about as secretive, headed by the old girl who I believe communicates telepathically . . . .
The pics are some of MsH's inherited share of the farm. Sugar and eucalyptus. No more cassava since 2013.
A farm manager (her b-in-law) and his son look after the place on behalf of the family as only the one sister - his wife - lives locally.
Four others all went off for tertiary/uni education and now 3 in Bangkok plus MsH in Chanthaburi, and none studied anything land/agri related.
B-I-L's a part-time hort/agri advisor for local govt, knows his stuff and runs the farm contracting business, all mechanised these days. Trustworthy, and an annual profit-share without getting those office-worker hands dirty!
Last year only small payout, they bought another big blue tractor and more planting/harvesting gadgets to fit on the back plus grabber things on the front (for sugar) that will, apparently, more than pay for itself within 3yrs
Spent a year living there Songkran-to-Songkran 2010-11 and no regrets (apart from a bit far to the beach - 200km)
Forgive my ignorance. Eucalyptus is farmed for oil or another purpose?
 

Hatari

Active member
Eucalyptus - grown for paper pulp
Two harvests per planting, cut off at ground level they re-sprout for a second harvest in about 5 years

A couple of tree huggers
 

Hatari

Active member
Five years. Grow like weeds, fast growing weeds

Sell them 'on the land' - all in cash! - buyer provides workers who cut, trim, transport, and sells to mill

These were ours


Transported off farm onto bigger trucks


After that we waited 3 weeks and then burnt off all the area, down the rows and ploughed in the ash with fertiliser, trunks start to re-sprout within weeks. The burnoff was mine! Great fun, though a little (eucalyptus scented) smoky

 

jontymate

Active member
Hatari;266106 said:
Five years. Grow like weeds, fast growing weeds

Sell them 'on the land' - all in cash! - buyer provides workers who cut, trim, transport, and sells to mill

These were ours


Transported off farm onto bigger trucks


After that we waited 3 weeks and then burnt off all the area, down the rows and ploughed in the ash with fertiliser, trunks start to re-sprout within weeks. The burnoff was mine! Great fun, though a little (eucalyptus scented) smoky

Really great info ......... return on the investment and the quantity of land employed ?
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
Those 6000 series Fords are great tractors - I had a S/H one on my farm back home.
The only problems with the Eucah is grubbing the stumps and they rob the ground of a lot of nutrients.

The oil comes from a species of Mallee bushes.
 

quiksilva

Active member
Enjoy the reports as always.
The two places in LOS outside of the main areas i have spent most my time in that you report on - Chanthaburi and Sa Kaoe
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
As a cash crop for paper pulp as Hatari said.
Off cuts may be used for charcoal/wood fires.
 

Hatari

Active member
I don't know if eucalyptus is termite or water resistant ie how long would poles last in the ground?

I had a 8m ladder made for me for a painting job, after i found i was too heavy for bamboo at that height, bounced about too much for my liking. Heavy and solid, kept dry under the house but in less than a year rungs had dried out, splitting.
Would have lasted better if i'd drilled rather than just nailed green wood
 

Hatari

Active member
jontymate;266121 said:
Really great info ......... return on the investment and the quantity of land employed ?
Returns in this case are difficult to nail down. Would it be ok to say 'not very much, but adequate, i wouldn't recommend it for a living'?
MsH owns some land independent to the main family owned property, the whole area managed by her b-in-l who also runs the contracting business which some of the family have shares in
Whenever i ask, i wish i hadn't, she switches to 'accountant speak', i switch off. "another cup of tea?''
There is cross-ownership, cross-charges, discounts on use of the tractors as required, shared labour costs, and ongoing investment in machines/equipment for the business all part of their little, and it is little, 'empire'
See, i'm getting a headache already.
Maybe Stephen Hawking could figure it out, for me his theories of the universe, big bang and time travel sound simpler
Having said that, the current 30 or is it 40 rai of euc is apparently the last, all going to be sugar, same as after the last area of eucs were sold, stumps ripped, ploughed and fertilised, in goes the sugar cane
Six years ago it was euc, cassava, sugar, and they lease out low-productive land to rice farmers for a fee + % return basis. Rather like in the Robin Hood movies.
They must be doing ok, more tractors in 2015 and in process of buying land from adjoining farm this year; it's the machinery that gives the real returns (so i am told!)
Pass the paracetamol
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Hatari;266225 said:
I don't know if eucalyptus is termite or water resistant ie how long would poles last in the ground?

I had a 8m ladder made for me for a painting job, after i found i was too heavy for bamboo at that height, bounced about too much for my liking. Heavy and solid, kept dry under the house but in less than a year rungs had dried out, splitting.
Would have lasted better if i'd drilled rather than just nailed green wood
Termites love it! Poles sometimes sprout new growth if too green and last a short while. Above-ground no problem.
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
It didn't take me too long to figure out that in Thai farming it's the contract tractor and truck drivers who make the money.
Too much capital for me to invest as an absentee owner.
 

Nomad

Well-known member
They were burning the cane close to CJ's place...couldn't believe how quick it went through, and the local barely notice it rip past.

 

jontymate

Active member
Nomad;266260 said:
They were burning the cane close to CJ's place...couldn't believe how quick it went through, and the local barely notice it rip past.

Did you go out and gather all of the food running away from the fire? 5555555
 

Hatari

Active member
Hatari;215228 said:
15.03.2015 Lived in this house for 12 months 2010-11; I renovated and re-stained the exterior, repainted the white - that was April 2010, and happy with how the stain/paint has lasted
This house on the property is to be sold, likely end up as furniture. A lot of good timber in there, built early 60s. Haggling over an initial offer 900k, they want 1m+.
Matching rice barn, 6x3 m sold for 300k, it was dismantled carefully, moved and reassembled to be modified as a guest room.
Complicated business selling and transporting old teak, permits and inspections required, as well as the obligatory monks when a house is pulled down.
Once saw a house that had been dismantled being carefully loaded into refrigerated container trucks, only after realised why, illegal deals
MsH also owns (inherited) a barn that was once a house with workshop in the front, 200km from where we live. Last year was told someone had stolen all the timber off the back wall. Got the rest pulled down and sold before it too 'faded into the night'
 

Nomad

Well-known member
jontymate;266351 said:
Did you go out and gather all of the food running away from the fire? 5555555

Did you have to say that? Hate to think how many snakes were unsettled.
 
S

Seven_

Guest
jontymate;266121 said:
Really great info ......... return on the investment and the quantity of land employed ?
Around here it's sold off for making bio fuel/power. Current price is 1000baht a tonne.

It's grown mainly on land that's not used for anything else, along roads, around dams etc. doesn't seem to go well when grown in a plantation around here.

Trees (seedlings) cost 1 baht, and you can cut and harvest it about every two years and it re-shoots again from the stumps.

No maintenance or fertiliser needed.

We are currently cutting now, have already cut over 60 tonne and have much more to go.

I hear people say it's used for charcoal making, it's not around here and is considered no good for making charcoal. They only use local hard woods around here for that.
 
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