Buying land after crisis is over

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
kaptainrob;433114 said:
My wife made a rule straight off. no kids allowed in our pool, (there's a mooban pool they can use). That solves the uninvited guest problem ... along with a big fence!

Our pool has 350mm thick walls and more steel than the Loi Kroh iron bridge... it wasn't going to float up out the ground last wet season as the water table rose. It's also built up 1.5m, 3/4 above ground, level with the pool deck. cabana and main house floor.

Pools cost from 500k upwards depending on size, shape and equipment. Ours is 10m x 4m and was just under 1mil complete with spa and mineral salt chlorination.



As Ash says, 5 or 6mil can get you a very nice build with pool, land extra.
But would the land quality be the same in CM vs the village?

I'd have to let the family kids use the pool, which I'd be happy with
Just not everyone in the village

But I think I'd definitely want a pool to make it what I want
 

Dupree

Well-known member
MarcTwoSix;433093 said:
I would want a pool to enjoy the house more

But quite honestly I have no idea what that would entail in a house in the village
But I would make it happen if I could
Make it big enough so the water buffalo can have a cool down..
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
OZZYGUY;433161 said:
You know in PI a lot of familys have a nanny and some a house boy. Lots of storys of the boss or the driver or both shagging the nanny.

My MIL's nanny is fugly as, welcome to shag her, dont think she has ever been shagged........55
I'd have a problem having workers
I definitely see the appeal but I'd have a hard time not being close to them

I remember one of the weirder BM's had a nanny that traveled with them and he wouldn't even talk to her
I couldn't do that

Oh plus my wife is absolutely OCD so don't think she'd ever let anyone clean anything of hers
 

Stillearly

Well-known member
MarcTwoSix;433100 said:
My 2 worries is building a pool on that type of land
But I've seen home stays in rice paddies with nice pools
So I guess possible

But having the only pool in village could bring a lot of unwanted guests! 5555
is this a substitute for your fantasy holiday threads , or is it really going to happen ?

;) ;) ;)
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
Stillearly;433201 said:
is this a substitute for your fantasy holiday threads , or is it really going to happen ?

;) ;) ;)
I will always have fantasy holiday threads 5555

But this is real.....would buy the land tomorrow if a good deal
 

OZZYGUY

Well-known member
MarcTwoSix;433200 said:
I'd have a problem having workers
I definitely see the appeal but I'd have a hard time not being close to them

I remember one of the weirder BM's had a nanny that traveled with them and he wouldn't even talk to her
I couldn't do that

Oh plus my wife is absolutely OCD so don't think she'd ever let anyone clean anything of hers
You can be close to them, MIL's nanny was with the family before my wife was born, she originally started with my wifes grand mother then when my MIL got married went with her. She took care of my wife all her life was sort of part of the family. She passed away last year. Lovely old girl.

The other nanny is about 32, the fugly one....55. My wife took her in as a street kid with no parents when she was 13. She had never been so school so Janice gave her a education and she worked in the house as well. Now at 32 she pretty much runs the house and when the old girl was alive took care of her too.

My buddy in Bandung in Indo has had his driver for over 20 years. The drivers wife works a few days a week for him too as a nanny.


Its how you treat them, they often become part of the family.
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
MarcTwoSix;433196 said:
But would the land quality be the same in CM vs the village?

I'd have to let the family kids use the pool, which I'd be happy with
Just not everyone in the village

But I think I'd definitely want a pool to make it what I want
By land I assume you mean the pedology, or soil type?

Soils differ all around the country though our land is perhaps similar as we're close to a river and the area was formally rice paddy some 30 years ago.
In lieu of a professional soil test I went on local knowledge along with the above history to confirm that our land was good for building.
I was aware that the original developer had built his house (on 4 rai) just 70m away and another house on 2 rai alongside.

Upon digging 2m deep foundation holes and trenches we actually broke 3 excavators, each replacement being a larger machine. Nearly 2m of fill had compacted like concrete above the original paddy soil.

By contrast, another build adjacent to a small road bridge across a lake found soft mud at 2m depth and required over 1mil in piling work. That was pure bad luck but highlights the need for soil test drilling on dubious sites.
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
kaptainrob;433261 said:
By land I assume you mean the pedology, or soil type?

Soils differ all around the country though our land is perhaps similar as we're close to a river and the area was formally rice paddy some 30 years ago.
In lieu of a professional soil test I went on local knowledge along with the above history to confirm that our land was good for building.
I was aware that the original developer had built his house (on 4 rai) just 70m away and another house on 2 rai alongside.

Upon digging 2m deep foundation holes and trenches we actually broke 3 excavators, each replacement being a larger machine. Nearly 2m of fill had compacted like concrete above the original paddy soil.

By contrast, another build adjacent to a small road bridge across a lake found soft mud at 2m depth and required over 1mil in piling work. That was pure bad luck but highlights the need for soil test drilling on dubious sites.
I mean how you have to fill in the land when building in the village
If that's the right terminology
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
MarcTwoSix;433262 said:
I mean how you have to fill in the land when building in the village
If that's the right terminology
Use local knowledge or a soil test engineer to determine what is required, as per my examples. You can either fill low lying land to a desired height, compact well and then build or simply build up higher than any historical flood heights. Either way, foundations go down to original soil level.

Most Thais build the land up and some ass holes go even higher than their neighbours which causes watershed across surrounding plots during the rainy season.
 

Buksida

Member
kaptainrob;433263 said:
Either way, foundations go down to original soil level.
I built a two story house in Bangkok once. After filling in the block, I left it for a year to settle. It still required piling - from memory the average pile depth was 23 metres. This required two-three piles on top of each other at each point. The most important part is securing the piles to each other. If there is any movement, your house is effectively only supported by the shallowest pile. The top layer of really loose sediment in Bangkok goes down to about 90 metres so pile skin friction is the deciding factor rather than hoping they rest on something hard. I remember the first pile in each position sank to depth under its own weight without driving. But that's Bangkok.

Other provinces outside of the Central Plain require local knowledge, as you state. I built a house in a northern province which is on the foothills leading up to the range typically separating each of the four major river basins. The foundations on this were comparatively shallow (<2m) footings about 6 square metres area in critical points for the house and the bottom slab tied to these. Anything not tied to these piers is still stinking, which has accelerated slightly during the current drought.

I also built some workshops in Khon Kaen basically on reinforced concrete slabs like houses in Australia. We have had no problem with slab cracking despite moving some very heavy vehicles on it.
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
Buksida;433277 said:
I built a two story house in Bangkok once. After filling in the block, I left it for a year to settle. It still required piling - from memory the average pile depth was 23 metres. This required two-three piles on top of each other at each point. The most important part is securing the piles to each other. If there is any movement, your house is effectively only supported by the shallowest pile. The top layer of really loose sediment in Bangkok goes down to about 90 metres so pile skin friction is the deciding factor rather than hoping they rest on something hard. I remember the first pile in each position sank to depth under its own weight without driving. But that's Bangkok.

Other provinces outside of the Central Plain require local knowledge, as you state. I built a house in a northern province which is on the foothills leading up to the range typically separating each of the four major river basins. The foundations on this were comparatively shallow (<2m) footings about 6 square metres area in critical points for the house and the bottom slab tied to these. Anything not tied to these piers is still stinking, which has accelerated slightly during the current drought.

I also built some workshops in Khon Kaen basically on reinforced concrete slabs like houses in Australia. We have had no problem with slab cracking despite moving some very heavy vehicles on it.
That all makes me scared 5555
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Buksida;433277 said:
I built a two story house in Bangkok once. After filling in the block, I left it for a year to settle. It still required piling - from memory the average pile depth was 23 metres. This required two-three piles on top of each other at each point. The most important part is securing the piles to each other. If there is any movement, your house is effectively only supported by the shallowest pile. The top layer of really loose sediment in Bangkok goes down to about 90 metres so pile skin friction is the deciding factor rather than hoping they rest on something hard. I remember the first pile in each position sank to depth under its own weight without driving. But that's Bangkok.

Other provinces outside of the Central Plain require local knowledge, as you state. I built a house in a northern province which is on the foothills leading up to the range typically separating each of the four major river basins. The foundations on this were comparatively shallow (<2m) footings about 6 square metres area in critical points for the house and the bottom slab tied to these. Anything not tied to these piers is still stinking, which has accelerated slightly during the current drought.

I also built some workshops in Khon Kaen basically on reinforced concrete slabs like houses in Australia. We have had no problem with slab cracking despite moving some very heavy vehicles on it.
I always enjoy watching Bangkok excavations, similar to Gold Coast hi-rise on beachfront sand lots, where they have have to work with unstable ground. I sat in the food court atop Terminal 21 for an hour or more one time just watching the methods they employ to excavate the river delta mud before piling work can even begin.

KKN developers use slab on ground and tilt panel construction, the latter being more common in commercial construction in Australia.
 

Moo Uaon

Well-known member
Our block was filled and allowed to settle for 5 years.... solid as a rock.
Have seen cracking in a lot of places built on old rice paddy's.
 

justcruzing1

Active member
There are 3 main methods of compacting soil when filling a block.

Time, leaving it to nature to settle and harden it, as said her takes 5 or more years and still may not have compacted enough.

Top loading, this is again using mother Nature but with assistance, you over fill the block loading on top of the fill another equal amount which puts loading and compaction on it. This can take 2 years or more.

Then there is mechanical loading. Every 300mm thickness of fill gets wet down and rolled 6 times by the heavy spike machine, then the next 300mm wet down, roll 6 times, rinse and repeat etc. This results in a 97% tensile (97% as strong as rock)

Each of the above have different costs and it depends on your intended time frame. Although the last one costs initially, some of that cost is offset by the no need for pieing and its associated cost. That is for slab on ground construction.

For slab construction there are other factors to be addressed as well, like soil elasticity.

From watching Rivo, Rob and a couple of other people not on this forum, build homes in LOS I realize they use some different methods than we do, some seem very smart too.
 

Bacon

Administrator
kaptainrob;433153 said:
haha ... I told Jo all about maintenance and costs ... she's yet to learn the basics. Next weeks program!

I must admit that weekly maintenance with this mineral salt system (Aussie PuraPool) is proving quite easy. Storms will cause an imbalance and some cleaning but nothing serious. House design blocks most storm/leaf litter and I've yet to use the leaf scoop. Vacuum ~ once a month?

Cost of electricity and chemical = approx 1500 baht per month.
Mind you, maintenance is easy when you're using the pool because it is just that. I did find it easy enough to keep the pool balanced during summer, but it's those winter months when you're not using it that become a pain. You slip a few days and then it turns into real work getting it back to normal. I've let pools go for weeks before and ended up paying through the nose getting someone to come and sort it out.

Defo in SEA. They're essential.


MarcTwoSix;433196 said:
I'd have to let the family kids use the pool, which I'd be happy with
Just not everyone in the village
Screw that. All these kids in your pool. That's when you have to start laying down markers for the peeing and non peeing sections.
 

bacwaan

Well-known member
well there may not be the kind of bargains on offer with land out there being created by this virus but I just saw an ad on TV for Chevrolet...they are offering huge discounts on their pick-ups atm...the highest option in the line is down from 999K baht to 775K baht and that sort of discount continues down to the lower priced options

you still in the market for a car for Nut Paulie?..its one area I think a bargain could be had in a couple of months...mass unemployment will surely cause people to miss payments on their cars leading to repo's etc down the line
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
bacwaan;433729 said:
well there may not be the kind of bargains on offer with land out there being created by this virus but I just saw an ad on TV for Chevrolet...they are offering huge discounts on their pick-ups atm...the highest option in the line is down from 999K baht to 775K baht and that sort of discount continues down to the lower priced options

you still in the market for a car for Nut Paulie?..its one area I think a bargain could be had in a couple of months...mass unemployment will surely cause people to miss payments on their cars leading to repo's etc down the line
Yeah for sure and thanks for pointing that out

I wouldn't buy him a new car but if there is decent bargains I would pay a bit more than I would have to get a less older car
 

anmeno

Well-known member
MarcTwoSix;433738 said:
Yeah for sure and thanks for pointing that out

I wouldn't buy him a new car but if there is decent bargains I would pay a bit more than I would have to get a less older car
Buy a new to your wife and give him her old car.
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
anmeno;433749 said:
Buy a new to your wife and give him her old car.
After this the plan is for Ao to be in Canada for quite some time
Logical thing would be for him to just use her car instead of it sitting there

But she is balking at that
But think I will get my way
 

justcruzing1

Active member
MarcTwoSix;433757 said:
After this the plan is for Ao to be in Canada for quite some time
Logical thing would be for him to just use her car instead of it sitting there

But she is balking at that
But think I will get my way
Tell her to sell it and wait for the low ball prices offered, she will say no I give to Nut for that price.
 
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