Farming in Thailand

wabbits

Active member
Bil has a nice big Kabota rice planter firkin huge good looking bit of kit.
And has the cane planting attachment man it's quick to plant a rai.
I see a lot of mechanisation appearing not so much subsistence farming anymore.
I wonder if this will push more land into fewer hands?
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
wabbits;255355 said:
Bil has a nice big Kabota rice planter firkin huge good looking bit of kit.
And has the cane planting attachment man it's quick to plant a rai.
I see a lot of mechanisation appearing not so much subsistence farming anymore.
I wonder if this will push more land into fewer hands?
Already happening around Jo's baan. BKK investors buying up land and leasing back, for now. Same same dairy farming in NZ ... 50 years ago.
 

wabbits

Active member
kaptainrob;255474 said:
Already happening around Jo's baan. BKK investors buying up land and leasing back, for now. Same same dairy farming in NZ ... 50 years ago.
From what I have seen and the discussions of land sales where we are due to proximity to Chom Chong laden is sky rocketing and small plots are being bought up.
 
S

Seven_

Guest
kaptainrob;255343 said:
Threshing good fun from sun up >



I did 70 bags that morning ... no whisky!
Been there done that, this way is harder, also been there done that (best avoided if you ask me)





 
Z

Zablive

Guest
Yeah KRob - weren't you just bagging off? Did you hand sew them as well?
 

wabbits

Active member
Seven_;255548 said:
Is it a seeder or transplanter?
Had to go look on the Kabota site to work that out.55555 was a Harvester not sure if he has a seeder.
Sorry farming novice in many ways.
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
^ could've left out the 'military' word in heading ... just adds fodder to the unbelievers.

This drought was a dead cert almost 12 months ago and it will take severe hardship to 'educate' Thailand about water management. The Government is aware of the problem.

Strangely, my family farm is doing ok and rice is flourishing. They had unseasonal rains whilst neigbouring Khon Kaen (west) and Ubon Ratchathani (southeast) are really suffering.

We have more water flowing past our house than last year, kind of strange, perhaps something to do with a new mooban built nearby (behind Moo's old rental) and I suggested our maintenance crews clean out all lakes and khlongs in prep for La Nina .... They are doing exactly this, I'm surprised!
 

MarcTwoSix

Well-known member
kaptainrob;272910 said:
^ could've left out the 'military' word in heading ... just adds fodder to the unbelievers.

!
Did you actually read the article and his point?
Or just blindly jump once you see "military" in something?
 

Quarky

Administrator
Finally, long-term planning ideas such as sea walls to cope with rising sea levels need to be reconsidered. Additional "monkey cheek" water-retention basins, pursued by the present government to combat flooding, can also ensure regions are self-sufficient in water for the long-term, as can a sensitively-implemented national reforestation plan.

Crucially, these measures must be responsive to constituents, accountable, and equitably distributed to prevent intra-regional water conflicts along political or ethnic lines. Disasters such as drought and flooding are associated more with authoritarian regimes, whether due to a "parliamentary dictatorship" or military governments, as compared to democratic governments, a phenomenon termed the "democratic advantage". This is due to democracies having better feedback links including elections, public criticism and a freer media.

.
John Draper is Project Officer, Isan Culture Maintenance and Revitalisation Programme (ICMRP), College of Local Administration (COLA), Khon Kaen University. Peerasit Kamnuansilpa, Phd, is founder and former dean of the College of Local Administration, Khon Kaen University.
 

retdent

New member
Hi 7,
Just wondering if I can hop onto this farming thread since I could not find anything elsewhere in a quick glance. I spent the majority of my adult life just outside of Launceston and have many friends and associates that farm. I have always had an interest in it and considered going to Ag college at one stage, but the financials of getting onto the land stopped me. I went in a different direction, but managed to get into that rural lifestyle, which for me shi*s all over city living.

From a home gardeners' perspective, rural living allowed one to improve the soil gradually over many years, because things like cow manure from feed lots was readily available and later on poppy trash from the mills at a very modest cost. Over the years soil quality was fantastic and the soil easier to work manually. To bring this back to Thailand, I am trying to work out ways to improve where I am, and would like to add humus to the soil which will help in moisture retention and hopefully make the ground less hard. My thoughts at the moment are to add rice straw and dig it in. I also am thinking about contracting out to some one to grow a rai or two of maize and put it through a hammermill (if I can find one) and use this as a mulching agent which would be dug in when the next crop is going to be planted. Fortunately, not relying on farming for an income makes the consideration of cost secondary.

What are your thoughts and that of other members of this, in Thailand.

Thanks.
 

RakThai

Well-known member
retdent;285721 said:
Hi 7,
Just wondering if I can hop onto this farming thread since I could not find anything elsewhere in a quick glance. I spent the majority of my adult life just outside of Launceston and have many friends and associates that farm. I have always had an interest in it and considered going to Ag college at one stage, but the financials of getting onto the land stopped me. I went in a different direction, but managed to get into that rural lifestyle, which for me shi*s all over city living.

From a home gardeners' perspective, rural living allowed one to improve the soil gradually over many years, because things like cow manure from feed lots was readily available and later on poppy trash from the mills at a very modest cost. Over the years soil quality was fantastic and the soil easier to work manually. To bring this back to Thailand, I am trying to work out ways to improve where I am, and would like to add humus to the soil which will help in moisture retention and hopefully make the ground less hard. My thoughts at the moment are to add rice straw and dig it in. I also am thinking about contracting out to some one to grow a rai or two of maize and put it through a hammermill (if I can find one) and use this as a mulching agent which would be dug in when the next crop is going to be planted. Fortunately, not relying on farming for an income makes the consideration of cost secondary.

What are your thoughts and that of other members of this, in Thailand.

Thanks.
It is a very time-consuming effort to fertilize poor soil by adding fertilizer in whatever form to it.
Always easier to remove the poor soil and replace it by fertile soil..
Especially when you are talking about the land you are building on, building contaminates the soil with a lot of building products that are very bad for anything growing..

Otherwise, simple rule is water + sunlight = carbohydrates, so make a large shallow pond with fast growing stuff in it, like bamboo kind of stuff... You will be growing insects and snakes as well though..555
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
Make yourself a compost tumbler and start with that.
I agree about investing in a few loads of good topsoil.
 
S

Seven_

Guest
retdent;285721 said:
From a home gardeners' perspective, rural living allowed one to improve the soil gradually over many years, because things like cow manure from feed lots was readily available and later on poppy trash from the mills at a very modest cost. Over the years soil quality was fantastic and the soil easier to work manually. To bring this back to Thailand, I am trying to work out ways to improve where I am, and would like to add humus to the soil which will help in moisture retention and hopefully make the ground less hard. My thoughts at the moment are to add rice straw and dig it in. I also am thinking about contracting out to some one to grow a rai or two of maize and put it through a hammermill (if I can find one) and use this as a mulching agent which would be dug in when the next crop is going to be planted. Fortunately, not relying on farming for an income makes the consideration of cost secondary.

What are your thoughts and that of other members of this, in Thailand.

Thanks.
Rice straw could be used, but it would work better if it was chopped up into smaller stork lengths as the long length of the stork would make composting a harder and longer process. You should be able to pick up small bales for around 30 baht, although the price may increase over the next few months due to lack of cattle grazing land and increase demand for feed.

I would look at using rice husks instead, already a good size and a excellent mulching source. Even better if you can get some that has been used as flooring/bedding for pigs or chickens.

It’s often used in Thailand as a base for most potting mixes.

If you are near a sugar mill, you can also use bagasse (sugar mill waste), better with a bit of molasses in it so speeds up the composting process.

You can also buy the waste leaves/storks from sugar cane fields if you’re looking for "brown" base for composting.

All of the above options will need manure plus green waste added to make them more useful.

As to making the ground less hard in the drier months, you could add gypsum if you need a clay breaker, but depends on the soil type.

Really what you need, depends on, the size of the land, what you are planning to grow, the type of soil you have already, the return on investment you are looking for and what you are looking to achieve.
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Retdents soil is already "good enuff to eat" compared with ours. Rice husk and straw should do the trick especially if composted in a 200L blue bin with cow poo.

40 bags of 30bt/bag cow poo has done wonders already, both as fertiliser and mulch, by pre-mixing with water to make a slurry before adding to our garden beds. A 200L blue bin composter is next on the want list.

Bagasse or pig poo hard to come by.
 

retdent

New member
Thanks guys,
Rice husks should be no problem, the chap next door to Noi's mum's house has a rice cleaning plant (vintage IXL style), I will have no trouble getting any amount there. While the soil is OK, it has plenty of room for improvement which I will work on, probably forever. A guy in Tassie by the name of Burt Farquar did amazing things on massive acreages with worms. I may even have a go at increasing the worm population. Maintaining moisture could be a problem, but we seem to have plenty of bore water.
 
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