Living wills in thailand

Minder

Well-known member
Approaching?
When did all the clocks start going backwards? 555

Good post though.
 

RakThai

Well-known member
It's a good thing to think about, and a living will can be a very helpful tool, but..

A living will is a legal document, which means all shades of gray have to be divided in either black or white...
And medical issues often are neither black or white (well, if they are there is no need for a living will)..

I can give a list of examples, but let's take an extreme to make it clear..
Anafylactic shock is an acute allergic reaction. Can be from something you eat, a bee-sting or a bite from a snake or scorpion.
Swelling of soft tissue (eyes, face, throat) is very acute and the swelling of the mouth and throat can be life threatening.
Same time, blood-pressure drops dramatically and the heart frequency skyrockets.
The intervention is relative simple, intubation and ventilation (which is mechanical respiration), IV fluids and high dose anti-histamines and Prednisolon.
After 2 hours a patient usually has improved enough to breath and the heart will be stable. In 24 hours he can leave the hospital.

I understand that this is not the situation you have in mind when writing a living will, but the way these documents are written, they actually say you not permit the treatment described above..

Second thing is trans-cultural / language issues. What you write is what you mean. But in a country as Thailand, will it be understood in the same way?
And the practical side of it.. When I worked on Emergency Ward, in acute situations you just act. There simply is no time to check pockets for "special wish lists".

What I advice here (like to my parents) is to appoint a trustee, surrogate (not sure what the right word in English is) to act as legal representative when they are not able to speak for themselves.
This could be very difficult in Thailand, it is not easy to speak up to authority (a doctor) for most Thais..
 

Ian Forbes

New member
Good thoughts, Rak. I spent $1500 on a living will in Canada a couple years ago. I also have a less intensive will in Thailand where all my possessions go to a certain person I care for in Thailand. They aren't much, and my Canadian family doesn't care, but they are worth something.

However, I never gave a thought to a situation in Thailand where I might not be able to communicate with doctors in such circumstances as you outlined. Hey, and I DO play with venomous snakes and scorpions! 555





 

Quarky

Administrator
RakThai;294362 said:
It's a good thing to think about, and a living will can be a very helpful tool, but..

A living will is a legal document, which means all shades of gray have to be divided in either black or white...
And medical issues often are neither black or white (well, if they are there is no need for a living will)..

I can give a list of examples, but let's take an extreme to make it clear..
Anafylactic shock is an acute allergic reaction. Can be from something you eat, a bee-sting or a bite from a snake or scorpion.
Swelling of soft tissue (eyes, face, throat) is very acute and the swelling of the mouth and throat can be life threatening.
Same time, blood-pressure drops dramatically and the heart frequency skyrockets.
The intervention is relative simple, intubation and ventilation (which is mechanical respiration), IV fluids and high dose anti-histamines and Prednisolon.
After 2 hours a patient usually has improved enough to breath and the heart will be stable. In 24 hours he can leave the hospital.

I understand that this is not the situation you have in mind when writing a living will, but the way these documents are written, they actually say you not permit the treatment described above..

Second thing is trans-cultural / language issues. What you write is what you mean. But in a country as Thailand, will it be understood in the same way?
And the practical side of it.. When I worked on Emergency Ward, in acute situations you just act. There simply is no time to check pockets for "special wish lists".

What I advice here (like to my parents) is to appoint a trustee, surrogate (not sure what the right word in English is) to act as legal representative when they are not able to speak for themselves.
This could be very difficult in Thailand, it is not easy to speak up to authority (a doctor) for most Thais..
Power of attorney I think you mean Rak? I have one for my parents.
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
The link is the form approved by Bangkok Hospital (who now own Phuket International where I am a patient).
It is also available in Thai (recommended)

I wont be talking about banning two hours of resuscitation Rak or emergency care - but ongoing care to keep you "alive" by machine.
 
Top