Malaysia Travel: Some short trips from Kuala Lumpur

Hatari

Active member
I enjoy KL, but sometimes good to get away from the city, we've had single day trips or a week away, mix of rail and bus, low-priced and so far, reliable time-wise

Have not been to either of Cameron Highlands or Genting Highlands, was an option in November but chose to revisit Malacca instead

I won't give prices, what was 12.5 ringgit in November could be 13 ringgit now . . .

Start with an easy half-day outing, Batu Caves

 

Hatari

Active member
Batu Caves

A 25 minute train ride (KTM Kommuter) from KL Sentral railway station takes you to Batu Caves, trains arrive/depart every 30 minutes.

About 100m above ground level, the Batu Caves temple complex is of three main caves and several smaller ones. The biggest, referred to as Cathedral Cave or Temple Cave, has a 100 m-high ceiling and features ornate Hindu shrines. To reach it, a steep 272 steps.







Ramayana Cave - outside is a 15 m tall statue of Hanuman and a temple dedicated to Hanuman, the noble monkey devotee and aide of Lord Rama.

Inside the Ramayana Cave the story of Rama is depicted in a chronicle manner along the walls of the cave.




There are 3 main attractions at Batu Caves which is a limestone hill riddled with caves. The main Cave is known as the Temple Cave or Cathedral Cave and is accessed by a steep flight of 272 steps. The steps are thronged with troupes of greedy macaques who will harass you for food if you are carrying any (better not to feed them).

The top of the stairs brings you into a massive cave with a high vaulted ceiling. The cave serves as a Hindu Temple devoted to Lord Muragan whose 42 meter high gold statue stands guard outside. During the Thaipusam festival (which falls in January or February each year) hundreds of thousands of believers will throng to the cave, including a number who impale themselves with skewers and hooks as acts of penitence and devotion. Unless you are particularly fond of huge crowds or wish to take part in the festival, you might want to avoid visiting Batu Caves at this time.

There is no entry fee for visiting the Temple Cave although you may leave a donation in one of the collection boxes if you wish.
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Hatari;269245 said:
Batu Caves

A 25 minute train ride from KL Sentral railway station takes you to Batu Caves, trains arrive/depart every 30 minutes.

About 100m above ground level, the Batu Caves temple complex is of three main caves and several smaller ones. The biggest, referred to as Cathedral Cave or Temple Cave, has a 100 m-high ceiling and features ornate Hindu shrines. To reach it, a steep 272 steps.



Ramayana Cave - outside is a 15 m tall statue of Hanuman and a temple dedicated to Hanuman, the noble monkey devotee and aide of Lord Rama.

Inside the Ramayana Cave the story of Rama is depicted in a chronicle manner along the walls of the cave.
Batu caves were a little disappointing for me, over-commercialised perhaps. Catba Island, Vietnam caves or Pang Mapha - Mae Hong Son are more natural and larger too.

In KL itself we found the park below Petronas Towers a pleasant oasis and Jalan Alor evening street food the best.

 

Hatari

Active member
Pulau Ketam

This was MsH's idea, she read about Pulau Ketam and that was it, next trip to Malaysia off we went. As we were to be staying a week in Klang about an hour from KL we were already part way to PK, another train trip from Klang city to Port Klang, then off to sea in an enclosed, streamliner ferry



 

Hatari

Active member
Pulau Ketam

“Crab Island” is a small island located off the coast of Port Klang. The island is easily accessible from Kuala Lumpur, about 1hr 10min by train, then ferry from Port Klang jetty 30 minutes.

There are no roads, no cars or motorbikes; all the houses are built on stilts and access is by raised walkways above the swamp/mangroves. About 7000 people live there, mostly Chinese - the island's website says there are only about 50 Malaysians.

An easy day trip, or there is accommodation available (homestay or hotel). Plenty of dining options - Pulau Ketam is renowned for the fresh crabs, prawns and fish on the menu.

It's a scruffy place, more a curiosity imo than a tourist place, apart from the food and wandering around the walkways that serve as streets, well that's about it. But we went there, and I like to see for myself, different lifestyle at this little island town on stilts

 

Hatari

Active member
Info from Pulau Ketam website Pulau Ketam (

Pulau Ketam, literally translated, means “crab island”. It is a small island located off the coast of Klang. The island is easily accessible from the Port Klang jetty by ferry. The “floating houses” that come to view as visitors approach the island is a sight to awe any city slickers. Perching casually on long wooden stilts, these dwellings are suspended about one to ten (1-10) metre above sea level.

Pulau Ketam is the best opportunity for visitors to witness and experience the unique lifestyle of fishermen. Homestay facilities are readily available. And, Pulau Ketam also having a very special viewpoint with town city where this island escape from air polutions, traffic jams, finding car parking problem etc.
 

Moo Uaon

Well-known member
batu caves have been vandalised by the authorities there! what a mess they've made of the place.

best trip i've done out of KL was to kota kinabalu. 10 flights/day and around 2 hours. plenty to do and see there.
 

Hatari

Active member
Malacca/Melaka

Have had two holidays based in the historic/heritage area of Malacca





First time, took train to BTS Bandar Tasik Selatan station, and bus from there, but most recently 8 weeks ago took bus direct from the airport, saves going in to KL city

Interesting transport options when you get there, but i prefer either to walk, or hire a standard bicycle

 

Hatari

Active member
Malacca/Melaka



The Christ Church. Building began 1741 to commemorate 100 years of Dutch rule, and it was completed in 1753



The ruins of St. Paul’s church stand at the summit of St. Paul’s hill near the remains of A Famosa fortress. The site was originally occupied by the “Chapel of the Annunciation”, which was built in 1521 by Duarte Coelho in gratitude to the Virgin Mary for saving his life in the South China sea. In 1548 the Archbishop of Goa in India handed over the church to the Jesuits, who began renovating it in 1566

When the Dutch wrestled Malacca from the Portuguese in 1641, they destroyed all the Portuguese buildings except for the fortress, on which they placed the Dutch emblem. The Dutch also took over the Portuguese chapel on top of the hill, repaired and reconsecrated it into a Dutch Reformed Church, calling it St. Paul’s Church, a name which remains until today. The Dutch used it for their worship for the next 112 years, until they built their own church at the foot of the hill, Christ Church. St. Paul’s Church was then abandoned.

When the British took over Malacca in 1824, the St. Paul’s Church had lost its tower. However, the British added a lighthouse in front of it. And instead of being used it as a place of worship, the Church became a convenient storehouse for British gun powder.




Malacca: A’ Fomosa (Porta de Santiago)

Built by the Portuguese in 1511and heavily damaged by the Dutch during their invasion - the gateway to historical Malacca. It is among the oldest surviving European architectural remains in Asia.
 

Hatari

Active member
Malacca/Melaka



The Malacca River cuts across Malacca town, on its way to the Straits of Malacca. It separates the civic district clustered at the foot of St Paul’s Hill, from the residential and commercial district of Heeren Street and Jonker Street.

In early days and through the centuries later, Malacca River was an important conduit for trade. In addition to being a source of fresh water, it enabled access to the interior, so that forest produce such as rattan, canes, gums and resins, could to be brought down to the market. By taking control of the river, the Portuguese conquered Malacca.



 

Hatari

Active member
Malacca/Melaka

A touch of rain



Malacca has had flooding in the past week

8 February 2016 The flood situation continues unabated in the southern states during the first day of the Chinese New Year. In Malacca, the number of victims increased to 4,600 people (1,005 families) Monday morning from 4,317 (956) Sunday night.
 

Hatari

Active member
Distantpeak;272772 said:
You get around don't you Hatari... interesting places too...


I liked the history of Malacca, 500+ years of Portuguese Dutch British Malay with Chinese, Malay, Muslim, Christian influences es


One thing i didn't do, was to take a trip across the Straits of Malacca to Indonesia and back, walked down to the boat area to check it out, but ran out of time

Been to KL so often, good to see a little more of the surrounding area, and 'old' Malacca's like a big museum, easy to visit, cost around 20rr 200baht by bus

And a few minutes walk to the 'new' Malacca
 

Hatari

Active member
Malacca/Melaka


Malacca: Flor de la Mar ship replica

Situated southwest from the Stadhuys (on the quayside off Jalan Merdeka), the Maritime Museum is housed in a towering, fullscale reconstruction of the Portuguese cargo ship, the Flor de la Mar - 34m high, 36m long and 8m wide.The original sank in Malacca’s harbour in 1511, laden with Portuguese treasure.

It’s one of Malacca’s better museums, displaying a collection of scale model ships that frequented its harbour during its maritime reign as well as old maps, weaponry and nautical- related relics.
 

Hatari

Active member
Malacca/Melaka



:..........


1. Sri Poyyatha Vinagaya Moorthy Temple
2. Gereja Methodist Cina (Chinese Methodist Church)
3. Church of St Francis Xavier
4. Masjid Kampung Kling, built in 1748, is one of the oldest mosques in Malaysia
 

Hatari

Active member
Penang



Too far for a day return trip, but Penang's an easy travel option from KL by air, bus or train
Plane takes you to the south of the island, bus or taxi from there
Bus station is about mid-island i suppose, taxi from there
Train stops at Butterworth on the mainland, easy five minute walk from there to the ferry to the island, at Georgetown

Old restored train near railway station at Butterworth


The ferry is free Penang to Butterworth, only pay going the other way




More, later
 
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