Retirement is bad for your health...

Quarky

Administrator
BBC News - Retirement harmful to health study says

Retirement has a detrimental impact on mental and physical health, a new study has found.

The study, published by the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA), a think tank, found that retirement results in a "drastic decline in health" in the medium and long term.

The IEA said the study suggests people should work for longer for health as well as economic reasons.

******

The study suggests there is a small boost to health immediately after retirement, before a significant decline in the longer term.

Retirement is found to increase the chances of suffering from clinical depression by 40%, while you are 60% more likely to suffer from a physical condition.

The effect is the same for men and women, while the chances of becoming ill appear to increase with the length of time spent in retirement.
Anyone else feeling ill since they retired?

I wonder if it depends on where you retire to... 555
 

Ian Forbes

New member
Distantpeak;74445 said:
BBC News - Retirement harmful to health study says



Anyone else feeling ill since they retired?

I wonder if it depends on where you retire to... 555
You hit the nail on the head, Distantpeak.

There are similar pictures of me 14 years apart... before and after I retired and came to Thailand. It doesn't look like I've changed much. Being happy all the time might have something to do with it.


But I've changed a bit since I was married 45 years ago, and even more since I was a teenager...
 

Soupdragon

Well-known member
My job many years ago was working for a multinational insurance company in Pension Claims for company pension schemes . When people retired I looked at their accrued entitlements and paid out cash lump sums and set up pensions.

Some of the claims I settled were rather large and I thought off you go fella with that amount of cash and annuity the world is your oyster. Now it wasn't just the rich retirees but over the years in the job I was alarmed to see how many death certificates came across my desk of people whose pension claims I had handled. It was almost as though the job stopped and shortly after so did they.

I would say my years in that job definitely influence my life choices in that I wasn't going to leave it too late to do the things I wanted to do. Carpe Diem.
 

Ian Forbes

New member
Yes;74496 said:
That does not look like that much aging for 14 years Ian
I know and don't know how to explain it other than I am a very happy man. All I can go by is how Thailand has affected me since 1997.

I can only go by the words of Tom T Hall and the old cowboy's answer to life... Faster Horses..

Faster horses, younger women, older whiskey and more money.
 

Quarky

Administrator
Soupdragon;74490 said:
I would say my years in that job definitely influence my life choices in that I wasn't going to leave it too late to do the things I wanted to do. Carpe Diem.
I think that's the crux... having things you want to do. If you retire into a haze of boredom because your job gave you the only stimulus in life... then you are doomed... but if retirement is seen an opportunity... well, it has made Ian look younger for starters... 55
 

PeteGill

Well-known member
^^^ i can't wait to get out of my job, it gets in the way of all the other things that I want to do 5555
 

RakThai

Well-known member
This is a good article showing there is no difference.. Is retirement good or bad for mental and physical health functioning? Whitehall II longitudinal study of civil servants -- Mein et al. 57 (1): 46 -- Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
Yes, it is old (2003) but it is a longitudinal study..

I think retirement as such does not have any health effects..
What does, is going from high activity to doing nothing (described in athletes which had to stop sudden because of an injury),
Or to go from high stress levels to low suddenly..

In my work I have pleaded for gradual retirement for years, but it is not very well accepted in our (esp coporate) culture..
Experiments we have done, giving the senior employees a learner / master role and have them built down their work.. Works great, they all find alternative things to do in their spare time and are very happy with it..
 

PeteGill

Well-known member
If you have interests outside of your work environment and if you are fit and healthy. There is no reason why retirement cannot be a great time in your life.....
All that extra free time to do the things that you enjoy…
 

Ian Forbes

New member
RakThai;74598 said:
This is a good article showing there is no difference.. Is retirement good or bad for mental and physical health functioning? Whitehall II longitudinal study of civil servants -- Mein et al. 57 (1): 46 -- Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
Yes, it is old (2003) but it is a longitudinal study..

I think retirement as such does not have any health effects..
What does, is going from high activity to doing nothing (described in athletes which had to stop sudden because of an injury),
Or to go from high stress levels to low suddenly..

In my work I have pleaded for gradual retirement for years, but it is not very well accepted in our (esp coporate) culture..
Experiments we have done, giving the senior employees a learner / master role and have them built down their work.. Works great, they all find alternative things to do in their spare time and are very happy with it..
Excellent point, RakThai. I remember when a lot of us hit 50 in our outdoor careers in Forestry. Many of us enjoyed what we did, but we would have preferred a 3 day work week for no other reason than we liked to have more time off to do other things. For some of us it worked out. Some of us long term employees were fortunate to have 60 days holidays each year as well as extra time for sick leave or over time worked. When people asked me what work I did for a living I laughingly replied that I didn't work. They just paid me to enjoy myself. I just turned up at the office each day at 8 AM, grabbed a truck and went off to enjoy myself for about 7 or 8 hours before reporting to the office (by radio phone) at 4:30 PM to say I was staying in the field for another hour or so. I had a certain amount that I was expected to accomplish, but the rest of the time was my own. Because I was fast and efficient I could get all my "work" done in about 4 hours and the rest of the time I could do pretty much whatever I enjoyed in the outdoors. I think that kept me fit and young. I've always eaten well, exercised, never smoked or drank and pretty much stayed happy all the time.
 

RakThai

Well-known member
Your life sounds so good, and you seem to have everything going your way!
Don't tell us too much, we get envious..555

My father is about your age..
very active man all his life, retired from his job at 55 (when I told him he was going to be a granddad), but then he really started working...
Unpaid (some / most..), but with more passion and energy because he did what he really liked..
Cycled for fun for an hour or more everyday..

This ended about 10 years ago, when painting my house, he fell of the ladder and broke a couple of ribs..
This sent him on a fast track to old age.. And he has never reached the condition, nor the happiness he had before..

So count your blessings, Ian..
A healthy lifestyle is one, a good mindset second, but thirth is a great deal of luck!
 

Ian Forbes

New member
RakThai;74629 said:
Your life sounds so good, and you seem to have everything going your way!
Don't tell us too much, we get envious..555

My father is about your age..
very active man all his life, retired from his job at 55 (when I told him he was going to be a granddad), but then he really started working...
Unpaid (some / most..), but with more passion and energy because he did what he really liked..
Cycled for fun for an hour or more everyday..

This ended about 10 years ago, when painting my house, he fell of the ladder and broke a couple of ribs..
This sent him on a fast track to old age.. And he has never reached the condition, nor the happiness he had before..

So count your blessings, Ian..
A healthy lifestyle is one, a good mindset second, but thirth is a great deal of luck!
Especially the good luck. I know I'm only one fall off my motorbike between enjoying life and being a cripple. Fortunately, I have artistic interests that can keep me busy if I'm not physically active. An active mind is key to it all.
 

Moo Uaon

Well-known member
Lack of physical and mental stimulus can be a killer from what i`ve seen over the years.

I think my physical condition is great ATM with the regular dirt bashing up here in the north which is very physically demanding. And a bunch of projects going on at home that keep me going too.

My first couple of outings didn`t go too well as i had to pick the bike up a few times after dropping it on some really steep hills,was close to exhaustion then but i handle that sort of thing with ease now that my condition has built up remarkably!!

You can`t get to that level from walking and swimming but i do that in between rides anyway just to use the different muscle sets and work some stiffness out of them.
 

PeteGill

Well-known member
^^^ The secret is diversity in your exercise. Using different muscle groups. Cycling and running may both work on your cardiovascular system, but they use different sets of muscles.
I tend to alternate as it gives muscle groups the chance to recover, provides variety and gives me an all over better quality of fitness..
 

Moo Uaon

Well-known member
^ thats exactly it Pete.

The hardest part for retirees is getting the really hard workout that pushes the cardio vascular system to extremes.
 

jontymate

Active member
Ian Forbes;74654 said:
Especially the good luck. I know I'm only one fall off my motorbike between enjoying life and being a cripple. Fortunately, I have artistic interests that can keep me busy if I'm not physically active. An active mind is key to it all.

Thailand...



One way or another my life revolves around fishing.

From your differing pursuits I think there is also a good deal of using both sides of the brain as well. Just out of a matter of interest do you do any thing left handed or Goofy footed?

IE
Bat
Skateboard / Surf Left foot at the back
Box south paw etc?
 

Les1999

New member
A leading Insurance Company in Australia reckons a very high percentage of guys who retire die within 18 months - food for thought eh .....

I have always believed that when you retire you have to have one, or more, very good hobbies, whether its painting (pictures that is ...55) sports like golf or possibly woodwork ...... the main thing is don't sit and watch the TV all day - get out there and do something ..................... anyone got an idea for something for me to do .........55555555
 

Ian Forbes

New member
jontymate;74983 said:
From your differing pursuits I think there is also a good deal of using both sides of the brain as well. Just out of a matter of interest do you do any thing left handed or Goofy footed?

IE
Bat
Skateboard / Surf Left foot at the back
Box south paw etc?
I tie trout flies and it takes full use of both hands and all your fingers. I can also fly cast with both arms, but I'm much better with my dominant right hand. A lot of it has to do with self training.
 

Ian Forbes

New member
My main problem is I am a terrible procrastinator and I have to force myself to finish projects. I get things about 80% complete and then just leave them. I know what causes it, but doing something about it is a task I have to keep working on. Nothing I ever did was good enough for my father and he negatively criticized everything I did. Consequently, if I didn't finish something it couldn't be criticized. I enjoy positive criticism, or even negative criticism if it is backed up with valid reasons. I always enjoy a good debate on any subject providing the opposition doesn't get nasty.
 
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