Retirement is bad for your health...

bacwaan

Well-known member
there is a very good chance that all retirees will die at some stage....so this report must be absolutely correct
 

Bacon

Administrator
I reckon you gotta make sure you keep the noggin engaged when you retire. You let it get lazy and the grim ripper is sure to come a knocking before you expect it.

Also helps to plug into something nice and youthful every night to recharge.
 

Ian Forbes

New member
Bacon;75820 said:
I reckon you gotta make sure you keep the noggin engaged when you retire. You let it get lazy and the grim ripper is sure to come a knocking before you expect it.

Also helps to plug into something nice and youthful every night to recharge.
I totally agree. Us men have it lucky compared to women when they reach their 50s. I've been conversing with an old girl friend of mine in Canada and we've exchanged photos. She was slim, trim and attractive in the 1960s and I would not even recognize her today. She is still a lovely person but not some gal I would be taking to bed if I had a choice. So, it is really great to have the options that I do today. I've always said it helps to have an absorbing interest outside of work. I know for a fact that it DOES keep you young.
 
N

Nubbins

Guest
Quite a lot of people retire due to ill health, so it is not all that unexpected to see a significant proportion dying relatively soon after retirement.

I also have a theory about the otherwise healthy people (typically men) who retire at regulation age then die quickly soon after. I think there may be a correlation with introversion and extroversion. Those who derive their meaning and purpose from others (extroverts) don't do well in retirement. Those who are more self-reliant and enjoy their own company (introverts) do better. This is just my theory btw - no scientific basis.
 

Nomad

Well-known member
However, introverts in retirement can lose social interaction as it is no longer forced upon them via interacting at work, which can then lead to less mental stimulus and deterioration.
 

Bacon

Administrator
Nomad;76009 said:
However, introverts in retirement can lose social interaction as it is no longer forced upon them via interacting at work, which can then lead to less mental stimulus and deterioration.
But there are a million other alternatives to social interaction. Most social interaction is anything but stimulating anyway, unless you're in good company. The cesspool that is Facebook is just the electronic version of what people feed each other face to face on a daily basis. And it doesn't necessarily get any richer with age either.

You can read, write, travel, learn a musical instrument, learn a new language, start building things, etc, etc.. Unless people are overly lazy.

But then again, doing nothing and wanting to put your feet up is just as legitimate a way of spending your days as any other. Life has no rules. You make up your own. Some people are just tired, they're ready to go, and are just happy to rest and be while they wait. Nothing wrong with that either.
 
Y

Yes

Guest
I am 3 years into retirement now, going from being a workaholic to waking each day with almost nothing I need to do.The longer retirement happens the more challenging I find it. the first 2 years were easy. I wanted to travel all over LOS so here I am 45,000kms later already been to so many places I wanted to go some of them twice.
What is challenging is to constantly have to find your own motivation.There is little in the way of external circumstances or other peoples expectations that demand I do something.What I am missing is I do not create anything.I do enjoy being lazy also and am learning how to not be a compulsive doer.
Also being able to spend hours and hours with beautiful women,relaxing massaging,cuddling and making love is one of my favorite pastimes.Also just being in the moment,deciding "what do I want to do now"living without a plan,a schedule,is enjoyable and the lack of structure difficult.
I have no desire to have a job or business,and it will be interesting to see how the challenges of retirement unfold.
It is good to hear how other people are doing it.like new role models for a new generation of retirees.I feel I can learn from other peoples experiences and how they handle things.
 

Ian Forbes

New member
These forums are also a good stimulus. Most of my good friends in Canada were met via the internet fishing forums. I also met a fellow in Chiang Mai over an internet fishing forum and he was the main reason why I went up to northern Thailand. After Jon started showing me around the north I just wanted to see more and got into bike riding again. Now, Chiang Mai is my second home for 5 months of the year. But, I've always had many passions: fishing, hunting, photography, skiing, mountaineering, exploring, painting, drawing and writing about my experiences. It's never stopped. My 40 year career in Forestry was only to put me in places that I wouldn't otherwise visit on my own.
 

bacwaan

Well-known member
life is all about balance.....get that right (for yourself ie your own true balance) and you may come as close to self acualisation as is worldly possible
 
B

bepp

Guest
other than being on my own ,i fear having to retire soon.It is bad enough being on my own ,but how does one travel and enjoy life,as i've read,when the big $'s stop coming in weekly.I've never really been interested in other activities,only my work.So how does 1 plan for such a time,i am now 60
 

obes

Well-known member
bepp;76395 said:
other than being on my own ,i fear having to retire soon.It is bad enough being on my own ,but how does one travel and enjoy life,as i've read,when the big $'s stop coming in weekly.I've never really been interested in other activities,only my work.So how does 1 plan for such a time,i am now 60
Were you ever into anything like motorcycles, or mountain climbing, or bush walking, or fishing, or anything you really enjoyed?
If so, take it up again.

I convinced an older mate to get back into bikes a few years ago, after not having ridden for 30 years.
He's now 78 and still rides his rotex powered BMW 800 every weekend minimum and often takes off for an extended ride.
He's slowing down now, but credits him still being here with getting back into bikes.

Whatever you do, don't sit around wondering what you should have done, or you'll end up like my old man - in an aged peoples home rotting away...................
 

Moo Uaon

Well-known member
^ i gave up dirt riding nearly 30 years ago and got back into it here in LOS....loving every minute of it.
 

Ian Forbes

New member
obes;76399 said:
Were you ever into anything like motorcycles, or mountain climbing, or bush walking, or fishing, or anything you really enjoyed?
If so, take it up again.

I convinced an older mate to get back into bikes a few years ago, after not having ridden for 30 years.
He's now 78 and still rides his rotex powered BMW 800 every weekend minimum and often takes off for an extended ride.
He's slowing down now, but credits him still being here with getting back into bikes.

Whatever you do, don't sit around wondering what you should have done, or you'll end up like my old man - in an aged peoples home rotting away...................
Good points, obes. I'm 74 and feeling about 44. I got back into riding after 40 years when I came to Thailand, but didn't enjoy as much as I did until I got a proper bike. Once I bought the 250 D-Tracker it completely changed how I feel about riding. It's even enjoyable riding in heavy traffic in the city. It reminds me of paddling my canoe down a fast moving river where I have to dodge boulders and go down rapids. Everything is changing constantly and in motion at the same time. It keeps the mind alert at all times.
 

justcruzing1

Active member
bepp;76395 said:
other than being on my own ,i fear having to retire soon.It is bad enough being on my own ,but how does one travel and enjoy life,as i've read,when the big $'s stop coming in weekly.I've never really been interested in other activities,only my work.So how does 1 plan for such a time,i am now 60
I don't know where you live but if it is coastal most sailing clubs have weekly social races where visitors can come and get on board for nothing, just take some drink.
You don't have to do anything, just sit and change sides when they go about (duck your head).
They usually have a sausage sizzle when you come back and it's a great social setting, meeting people from all different walks of life with a common interest.

It's healthy for both body and mind, you can learn a bit of it if you want to and eventually do some of the on board work. Great social network as well.

And it doesn't cost anything. I sailed as a kid, had my own boat, then years later I started again on Wednesday afternoon out of Middle Harbor Yacht Club. I went and registered with the organizers and they had a list of who was racing and had room, introduced me to Sid and for the next 3 years I sailed on his 38ft yacht. Started on the fore deck then graduated to sail trimmer.
He was a multi multi millionair and his boat worth $4-500k but he was always first to shout when we got back.
Same with the other owners, all different ages, and the crews and guests were from everywhere, backpackers, owners of foreign banks everyone mixed in together for an hour or two after the race.
 

Ian Forbes

New member
Lasner;337555 said:
Yep it's important to stay active after you retire.
Welcome to the forum, Lasner. Thanks for reopening an old topic and discussion. It's kind of fun rereading old posts. Tell us something about yourself and your times in Thailand. I'm now in my 78th year (November birthday) and I still spend most of the winter in Thailand. I leave a motorbike over there and have 3 bikes here in Canada.
 

Cuzzy

Active member
Bacon;75820 said:
I reckon you gotta make sure you keep the noggin engaged when you retire. You let it get lazy and the grim ripper is sure to come a knocking before you expect it.

Also helps to plug into something nice and youthful every night to recharge.
Like... a bit on the side??
 
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