Tom Yum Mu

kaptainrob

Administrator
Tom Yum Mu – Isaan style spicy pork soup – Serves 4

A complete meal, eaten with fork and spoon and accompanied with Jasmine rice, the key to this delicious soup lies in the use of fresh ingredients and balance of flavours.
Cooking time ~ 2hrs 10mins includes preparation time ~ 2hrs.

Ingredients:
1kg Pork bones – meaty back bones ideal

4” *Galangal – whole root piece
12 *Red onions - small
12 *Garlic cloves
6 *Coriander roots
6 *Chilli – whole medium hot
6 *Lemongrass
1 T/sp *Tamarind pulp

4 Lemons – small green Thai lemons, juiced
4 Kaffir lime leaves – remove spines, tear into pieces
1 T/sp Palm sugar
1 T/sp Chili paste – Tom Yum paste if available (for colour)
1 tblsp Fish sauce
Salt to taste
Bunch of coriander leaves & 6 spring onions chopped – for garnish


Method:

Bring ~3 litres of water to the boil in a large saucepan. Add pork bones and boil for 2 hours or until meat is tender.



Meanwhile, roast the galangal, red onions, garlic, chilli and coriander roots. Use an oven or ‘brown’ slowly over hot coals, a gas flame, or in a cast iron skillet.



When cool, remove charred onion/garlic skin(s). Slice the galangal finely. Pound the roasted chilli to a coarse powder using a mortar/pestle. Bruise coriander roots with back of a knife.



Remove old dry brown and dark green leaves from lemongrass, bruise the stems severely so that flavour will release during cooking, and slice 3 stems, leaving the other 3 halved. They may be tied together for easy removal before serving if desired).



When pork bones are cooked, the meat tender, add the next 7 ingredients marked (*) and continue to simmer for 10 minutes. Remove saucepan from heat.
Cooking for any more than 10 minutes will NOT enhance flavour.
Add kaffir lime leaf, fish sauce, palm sugar, chilli paste and half of the lemon juice. Stir and taste … add salt, lemon juice or more fish sauce to achieve a balance.



To Serve: Place chopped coriander and spring onion into large soup bowls and spoon soup (with bones) over the top. Enjoy … 
 

Chob

Moderator
Youd reduce the cooking time substantially by using goong or aharn talay Rob?

Suggested cooking time for them?
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Chob;51947 said:
Youd reduce the cooking time substantially by using goong or aharn talay Rob?

Suggested cooking time for them?
Different recipe Chob. The ingredients change subtlety but significant enough that Jo will not substitute. eg: use of lemon, nam pla, carnation milk, chili etc....
If you or I made the change for a farangs-only meal, we'd get away with it.

Jo's Tom Yum Goong is superb, less phet phet than most recipes but oh so tasty! We cook it with prawn heads for flavour and colour and the meat goes in last, just before serving.... full recipe sometime soon.

Tom Sap Mu is a variation on Tom Yum Mu, using far more lemon and is less labour intensive. Bit like Som Tam ... many, many variations.
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
With Tom Yum Goong definitely add the prawn flesh last - 2-3 minutes is enough as they'll keep cooking after served.
A trick I learnt from a TG with Tom Yum was if you have guests who have varying tastes in heat, make the basic soup and then place the required number of chillis plus lime juice in the bowl before adding the soup.
 

OzzyDamo

Active member
That's fantastic!

I have never bbq my base stuff like that; I use smoked paprika powder- my own idea- seeing you do this, makes it seem like what I am doing, isn't so "original" an idea after all (Thai's don't give out recipes easily!).

That would taste SUPERB!
Big effort Kaptain!
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
Cooking is not about recipes - they are only a guide ...

EDIT: Ingredients vary as to their growing history, time of harvest, freshness and preparation.

That's before the sequential cooking process.

Any top chef would never insist on rigid rules for a dish - that's far too A-rententive.

Get an idea of the process, season and spice to taste, learn the difference between fresh and dried herbs and go for it.
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
This is the same process for starting a beef/pork/game stock - but browned in an oven rather than a BBQ to catch the marrow and juices.
Attached files
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
OzzyDamo;55432 said:
That's fantastic!

I have never bbq my base stuff like that; I use smoked paprika powder- my own idea- seeing you do this, makes it seem like what I am doing, isn't so "original" an idea after all (Thai's don't give out recipes easily!).

That would taste SUPERB!
Big effort Kaptain!
Thanks Damon.

Jo goes to great lengths to perfect flavours and balance. If one enjoys eating say, roast onions/garlic etc., it's easy understand the EXTRA dimension that sequence adds to flavour.

Small things like selecting the best quality lemons, smooth skin, firm, green, etc. is also important. I realised this when we had to use old yellowish lemons and the flavour wasn't same as normal. Just over-squeezing, releases too much oil from lemon skin and pith, and alters taste.
 

OzzyDamo

Active member
kaptainrob;51955 said:
Different recipe Chob. The ingredients change subtlety but significant enough that Jo will not substitute. eg: use of lemon, nam pla, carnation milk, chili etc....
If you or I made the change for a farangs-only meal, we'd get away with it.

Jo's Tom Yum Goong is superb, less phet phet than most recipes but oh so tasty! We cook it with prawn heads for flavour and colour and the meat goes in last, just before serving.... full recipe sometime soon.

Tom Sap Mu is a variation on Tom Yum Mu, using far more lemon and is less labour intensive. Bit like Som Tam ... many, many variations.
Noi was in total agree-ence with your comments here- Issan doesn't have seafood, Moo is the recipe.
Yes sea food shouldn't get over powered it cost too much to get masked......................
I will try this out- now to find a charcoal grill at Yuens Markets in the valley in brisso or the thai place next to the chinese medicine place.
 
D

daohoshi Dao

Guest
I remember ask jonty to buy some pork belly from the shop on the way home from working. We have a big fight because I could not say pork belly.

I said to him buy me pork with all the calorie on the out side good taste.
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
daohoshi Dao;55447 said:
I remember ask jonty to buy some pork belly from the shop on the way home from working. We have a big fight because I could not say pork belly.

I said to him buy me pork with all the calorie on the out side good taste.
I like that explanation but is it not easier to rub your tummy (stomach/belly) while saying "Mu"?
 

OzzyDamo

Active member
kaptainrob;55439 said:
Thanks Damon.

Jo goes to great lengths to perfect flavours and balance. If one enjoys eating say, roast onions/garlic etc., it's easy understand the EXTRA dimension that sequence adds to flavour.

Small things like selecting the best quality lemons, smooth skin, firm, green, etc. is also important. I realised this when we had to use old yellowish lemons and the flavour wasn't same as normal. Just over-squeezing, releases too much oil from lemon skin and pith, and alters taste.
Your a lucky Man!
 

OzzyDamo

Active member
Zablive;55436 said:
Cooking is not about recipes - they are only a guide ...

EDIT: Ingredients vary as to their growing history, time of harvest, freshness and preparation.

That's before the sequential cooking process.

Any top chef would never insist on rigid rules for a dish - that's far too A-rententive.

Get an idea of the process, season and spice to taste, learn the difference between fresh and dried herbs and go for it.
Everything animals do is in a constant state of evolution.............next stop the stars! 5 star cooking!
What was that song in kindergarden??? "bend and stretch reach for the stars!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZnXCX1Qx2Y
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Zablive;55436 said:
Cooking is not about recipes - they are only a guide ...

EDIT: Ingredients vary as to their growing history, time of harvest, freshness and preparation.

That's before the sequential cooking process.

Any top chef would never insist on rigid rules for a dish - that's far too A-rententive.

Get an idea of the process, season and spice to taste, learn the difference between fresh and dried herbs and go for it.
Totally agree. Recipes I publish here, (like the popular Women's Weekly series in Au) are designed for anyone with basic skills. Adhering to a recipe is desirable initially, and tweaking is what turns a simple meal into a memorable dinner.
 

kaptainrob

Administrator
Zablive;55436 said:
~
Any top chef would never insist on rigid rules for a dish - that's far too A-rententive.

Get an idea of the process, season and spice to taste, learn the difference between fresh and dried herbs and go for it.
Which chef are you referring to and what recipe or cuisine?

Pavlova, scones, som tam, pizza, ratatouille, chicken parmigiana, pork pie ....?
 
Z

Zablive

Guest
kaptainrob;55456 said:
Which chef are you referring to and what recipe or cuisine?

Pavlova, scones, som tam, pizza, ratatouille, chicken parmigiana, pork pie ....?
All - and all of the above.

Dishes taste according to palates - no-one has "the best for everyone."


Keeping posting your versions of local dishes (which have as many variations as the word "EEERRR") 555!

Cheers Zab.
 
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